Aspects of Land Grant College Education

Aspects of Land Grant College Education: With Special Reference to the University of Minnesota

PALMER O. JOHNSON
Copyright Date: 1934
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 283
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttqkm
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    Aspects of Land Grant College Education
    Book Description:

    Aspects of Land Grant College Education was first published in 1934. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. The author here presents a wealth of data pertaining to a group of land grant colleges and universities having more or less similar objectives, in a form that enable the reader to compare the policies of one institution with those of others in the group. The volume is based on official records in the United States office of education, particularly the data collected in the course of its recent survey of land grant institutions, and on additional data assembled by the author himself. The opening chapters, which deal with the financial problems of land grant institutions, include a comparative study of the fiscal policies of five large universities — California, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The author then proceeds to an analysis of the libraries of fourteen comparable institutions. One chapter deals with faculty personnel of the University of Minnesota, and the remainder of the book with students — their “migrations” from their home states, the carious types of higher educational institutions they enter, their social and economic characteristics, and their educational history. Also included are extensive tabulations of the occupational destinations and economic status of alumni.

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3792-2
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-xii)
  3. INTRODUCTION: THE SCOPE OF THE VOLUME
    (pp. 1-4)

    The land grant institution has made an important contribution to American education in extending to an ever widening group the opportunity for higher education. The most comprehensive study yet undertaken of this branch of our vast system of public education is that conducted a few years ago by the United States Office of Education and published in 1930 as a two-volume report under the titleSurvey of Land-Grant Colleges and Universities.

    In that survey the emphasis is laid upon the land grant institution as atypeof educational enterprise, theindividualcollege or university being considered for the most part...

  4. PART I. FISCAL ASPECTS

    • CHAPTER 1 THE SUPPORT OF PUBLIC EDUCATION IN SEVEN STATES
      (pp. 5-16)

      The funds that support our vast system of public education, which is administered by the forty-eight states individually, are derived from many sources. Naturally the several states do not receive the same amounts, nor even the same proportions of their total income from a given source, nor do they apportion their funds in the same way among the several branches of education. It is interesting and illuminating, therefore, to compare the policies of one state with those of others having a similar program. Such a comparison is here presented: the data for Minnesota covering the year 1927-28 are compared with...

    • CHAPTER 2 FISCAL TRENDS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA, 1910–28
      (pp. 17-32)

      Most state departments and institutions of Minnesota, including the University, have expanded tremendously in recent years. Ultimately, of course, such expansion must cease, for the people’s ability to pay taxes has definite limits. Just what the maximum expenditure for public services shall be and when it shall be reached it is difficult to determine in advance, but an analysis of incomes and expenditures over a period of years reveals certain significant developments. In this chapter we shall consider what has been the trend over a period of about twenty years in respect to (1) support of the University of Minnesota;...

    • CHAPTER 3 A COMPARISON OF FISCAL POLICIES AT THE UNIVERSITIES OF MINNESOTA, CALIFORNIA, ILLINOIS, OHIO, AND WISCONSIN, 1925–29
      (pp. 33-56)

      In the preceding chapter we saw that certain fiscal trends — some very well defined, others less so — were developing at the University of Minnesota during the two decades following 1910. The question naturally present itself as to whether or not these policies were representative of those among state universities in general. This chapter, in which are compared the fiscal practices of five universities during the five-year period 1925-29, will throw some light upon that question.

      It is recognized, of course, that generalizations are valid only as they apply to institutions that are similar, both with respect to their...

  5. PART II. FACILITIES OF LAND GRANT INSTITUTIONS

    • CHAPTER 4 LIBRARY FACILITIES
      (pp. 57-75)

      In his recently published autobiography Dr. William Watts Folwell, first president of the University of Minnesota, describes a small college library of the eighteen fifties. “This consisted mainly,” he says, “of old theology books and other lumber, with a sprinkling, however, of some books that a student could use. It was opened once a week by the professor of Latin and Greek and kept open for half an hour. So far as I remember, I never saw any other student in the dusty, illlighted, unheated room. I think the custodian was pleased when I went off and left him to...

    • CHAPTER 5 THE FACULTY PERSONNEL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
      (pp. 76-105)

      It is generally recognized that the effectiveness of educational policies and programs depends largely upon the teaching corps that must execute them. It is difficult, however, to single out and evaluate the importance of each of the many factors that contributes to success in college teaching. Training, experience, scholarship — these are all commonly regarded as significant, but the extent to which each is related to efficiency has never been satisfactorily determined, and no attempt is made here to do so. The present chapter describes rather than evaluates the University of Minnesota staff of 1927-28 in terms of these several...

  6. PART III. ENROLLMENT TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    • CHAPTER 6 RESIDENT AND NONRESIDENT STUDENTS AT LAND GRANT INSTITUTIONS
      (pp. 106-114)

      The proportion of students in a land grant college or university who are residents of the state may be regarded as one measure of the extent to which that institution is serving the people for whom it was primarily created. Some interchange of students is of course natural and even desirable, but large migrations suggest that educational facilities in the home state are, in some respects at least, limited.

      Two types of land grant institution are included in the analysis presented in this chapter: the state university, for which we have data from the universities of California, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio,...

    • CHAPTER 7 THE SELECTION OF A COLLEGE
      (pp. 115-125)

      In Chapter 6 we considered to what extent students of land grant colleges and universities are residents of the states in which those institutions are situated. The extent to which high school graduates enter other types of higher educational institutions than the land grant is also of interest and significance.

      The remarkable development of higher education during the last two generations is the result of an even more rapid expansion in the field of secondary education. Not only larger numbers, but larger proportions, of high school graduates have been continuing their education in the colleges and universities of the country....

    • CHAPTER 8 TRENDS IN ENROLLMENT IN AGRICULTURE, 1902–30
      (pp. 126-135)

      It is sometimes asserted that the separate land grant colleges have succeeded better than have the state universities in achieving the objectives originally proposed for the land grant institution. To support this claim comparative enrollments have been cited. The fallacy in this reasoning lies in assuming that all or almost all the enrollments of the separate colleges represent enrollments in agriculture and comparing them with agricultural enrollments in the universities. Actually, the Massachusetts College of Agriculture is the only land grant college that restricts its curricula to agriculture. Many land grant institutions have developed so broad a program that they...

  7. PART IV. THE STUDENT BODY OF A LAND GRANT DIVISION

    • CHAPTER 9 SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS
      (pp. 136-156)

      Since the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics of the University of Minnesota may be regarded as a typical land grant division, a study of its student body may appropriately be included in a treatment of land grant college education. For the purpose of obtaining the necessary data for such a study, the economic, social, and educational background of students, their occupational plans, and their expenditures and resources, a special questionnaire was prepared and submitted to them during the fall quarter of 1931. Of the 890 undergraduates in attendance at that time, 800 gave the desired information, 441 having...

    • CHAPTER 10 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH COLLEGE APTITUDE AND ACHIEVEMENT
      (pp. 157-177)

      The preceding chapter presented a survey of the students of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Home Economics at the University of Minnesota from the point of view of their social and economic backgrounds and of certain phases of their personal histories. In this chapter some of these data are correlated with measures of college aptitude and with scholastic success. The relation of aptitude to actual achievement, and of both of these to student survival, are also considered. It is not possible to trace out, with the analytical tools available at present, all the sources from which scholastic success proceeds;...

  8. PART V. THE HUMAN PRODUCT

    • CHAPTER 11 SOME ASPECTS OF THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC AND EDUCATIONAL HISTORY OF MINNESOTA ALUMNI
      (pp. 178-191)

      A large part of the survey of land grant institutions made by the Office of Education dealt with the machinery of these institutions, but some information was collected about the product, the men and women who have attended them. It is this information and certain general conclusions based upon it that the remaining chapters of this volume present.

      This chapter includes data concerning (1) the birth, nativity, age at entrance, and extent of training of graduates of the University of Minnesota and of ex-students that did not graduate; (2) the extent and means of student self-support; (3) participation in the...

    • CHAPTER 12 OCCUPATIONAL HISTORY OF UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA GRADUATES
      (pp. 192-229)

      It has always been held to be the right of every American to decide for himself how he shall make his living. The practical application of this principle is attended by many difficulties, however. To an ever increasing extent there are wide discrepancies between the number of positions available at a particular moment and the number of persons trained to fill those vacancies. The university, as an agency of the state charged with preparing men and women for certain special fields, is therefore interested in the question of their occupational destination and occupational stability.

      The two thousand persons chosen for...

    • CHAPTER 13 FINANCIAL STATUS OF GRADUATES AND NONGRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
      (pp. 230-259)

      In our discussion of factors in the selection of the initial position (see pages 219 to 222) we found that economic advantages had less influence on occupational selection than one might expect. To consider financial return as of chief importance in selecting an occupation would probably be a shortsighted policy, but to dismiss it entirely would certainly be just as shortsighted. The present study considers the annual earned incomes and the capital investments of former students in certain occupational groups for which sufficient data were available.

      The groups studied in this chapter include 873 graduates and 1,000 nongraduates of the...

    • CHAPTER 14 FARMING AS A PROFESSION
      (pp. 260-271)

      It is the opinion of some persons that our agricultural colleges are concerned primarily with training their students for careers other than farming — that most farm boys who enter these colleges do so in order to learn a profession that will enable them to leave the farm. Our chapter on the occupations of university graduates shows, however, that although graduates of agricultural colleges enter many different types of agricultural work, a substantial number of them engage in farming. The present chapter deals with this group of persons.

      The group under review consists of 630 alumni of agricultural colleges who...