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Cyberspaces of Everyday Life

MARK NUNES
Volume: 19
Copyright Date: 2006
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 280
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttrmg
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  • Book Info
    Cyberspaces of Everyday Life
    Book Description:

    Cyberspaces of Everyday Life provides a critical framework for understanding how the Internet takes part in the production of social space. Addressing the social implications of spam and anti-spam legislation, as well as how the Patriot Act has affected the relationship between networked spaces and daily living, Mark Nunes sheds light on the question of virtual space and its role in the offline world.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-9838-7
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. INTRODUCTION NETWORKS, SPACE, AND EVERYDAY LIFE
    (pp. xi-xxviii)

    In a single generation, network technology has radically altered everyday life in the developed world. The proof is the degree to which networks now pass unnoticed in daily life. Cyberspace, once a reference in a subgenre of science fiction, now marks a set of relations to computer-mediated communication (CMC) covering a range of everyday functions. More accurately, perhaps, we might say that the network itself defines and delimits “the everyday.” While theorists once hypothesized the significance of an emerging world of “virtual sex” and online infidelity, mainstream media outlets now advertise digital dating services that promise to connect users with...

  5. 1 THE PROBLEM OF CYBERSPACE
    (pp. 1-46)

    Much of the work I have done on CMC over the last decade has been driven by an attempt to ask, in various ways, a single question: Where does cyberspace take place?¹ When I first began asking a version of this question back in the mid-1990s, the terms of debate were notably different, obsessed as we were then with the promises and threats posed by telepresence and virtual worlds. Today, some ten years later and well beyond the end of the “cyberspace decade,”² the question may seem a bit anachronistic. Few theorists or media critics today are willing to embrace...

  6. 2 VIRTUAL WORLDS AND SITUATED SPACES TOPOGRAPHIES OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
    (pp. 47-85)

    In the previous chapter, I have attempted to justify considering CMC, and in particular the Internet, as a produced social space, understood as a dynamic event brought about by heteromorphic material, conceptual, and experiential processes. In this chapter and the following chapter, I attempt to situate this theoretical framework in relation to specific forms of CMC currently dominant on the Internet, namely the WWW and email. Given the divergent and often contradictory virtual topographies that result from these forces of spatial production, it would be difficult if not impossible to suggest a comprehensive map of cyberspace in all its conflicting...

  7. 3 EMAIL, THE LETTER, AND THE POST
    (pp. 86-126)

    It should come as no surprise that email ranks as the most common means by which individuals engage in computer-mediated communication. In fact, according to a Yankee Group survey of U.S. households online, 68 percent of American users ranked email as “their top online activity.” In volume, email is equally impressive: the number of emails originating in North America per day outpaces U.S. Postal Service (USPS) volume by over 1,000 percent.¹ According to IDC, an information technology research firm, daily worldwide emails were at 31 billion in 2002 and will reach 60 billion by the year 2006. Perhaps the rapid,...

  8. 4 STUDENT BODIES
    (pp. 127-159)

    In chapters 2 and 3, I attempted to explore how the production of online space provides a challenge to large, ontological categories of spatiality; namely, the global and the local, and the public and the private. In this chapter, my focus shifts to a specific instance of institutional space—the classroom—as a means of understanding how these spatial forms and structures articulate themselves in lived dispositional practices. On one hand, I am interested in the production of space as it relates to distance education. As the name implies, and as its history suggests, distance education takes the form of...

  9. AFTERWORD DIGITAL DIS-STROPHE
    (pp. 160-178)

    Truth be told, the “Y2K bug” was quite a disappointment. While the technopundits wooed us with visions of network failures worthy of millennial fervor, January 1, 2000, came and went without even a glimmer of the catastrophic. Yet the Y2K “bug” did reveal the degree to which the American apocalypse took the form of the network itself.

    As I suggest throughout this book, the dominant topographies of a network society produce spaces of control—lived spaces in which the network interface marks a set of material and conceptual relations that place a “world of information” at a user’s fingertips. Yet...

  10. NOTES
    (pp. 179-200)
  11. WORKS CITED
    (pp. 201-214)
  12. INDEX
    (pp. 215-223)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 224-224)