Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
Law and the Social Sciences

Law and the Social Sciences: The Second Half Century

JULIUS STONE
Copyright Date: 1966
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 128
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttsq7
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Law and the Social Sciences
    Book Description:

    The author, a distinguished authority on law, provides an illuminating and challenging discussion of the social aspects of law and legal problems. As a background to some penetrating observations, he takes stock of the contributions and interrelations of the bodies of knowledge, from both the juristic and the social science side, which bear upon the study of law at the present time. He is concerned to show the respects in which jurisprudential ideas in this area have been stimulated and clarified by work in the social sciences, and, conversely, to draw attention to the need for the increased interest of social scientists in this area to take account of juristic insights, many of them of long standing. He points out some of the dangers, not limited to waste of effort, arising from “parochialism” on the part of either the lawyer or the social scientist. The final section is devoted to a study of the contributions, potentialities, and limits of behavioralist and computer techniques in understanding and operating the appellate judicial process. The book is based on a series of three lectures given by the author as the William S. Pattee Memorial Lectures sponsored by the University of Minnesota Law School.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6460-3
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-2)
  3. WHERE LAW AND SOCIAL SCIENCE STAND
    (pp. 3-24)

    IN THE FIRST HALF of the twentieth century the relations of the legal order with the wider social order became established beyond question as a central (perhaps the central) juristic and jurisprudential concern. Attention was increasingly directed to the effects of law upon the complex of human attitudes, behavior, organization, environment, skills, and powers involved in the maintenance of particular societies, or kinds of societies; and conversely on the effects of these upon the particular legal order. Insofar as a particular legal order is itself part of the social order in which it arises the interrelations involved include the influences...

  4. PROGRAM AND MOVEMENT IN THE BORDERLANDS OF LAW AND SOCIAL SCIENCE
    (pp. 25-49)

    AS LONG AGO as 1912 Roscoe Pound formulated in this mood a series of practical objectives for sociological jurisprudence in common-law countries.¹ This program in its time was a powerful prod of the attention of lawyers towards the relations of law and society, both on the side of methodology, and on that ofad hocproblems of adjustment and maladjustment of law. If we think of the assessment of such a program in terms of neat and complete performance, then even in 1943, when the present author was writingThe Province and Function of Law, it seemed necessary to lament...

  5. MAN AND MACHINE IN THE SEARCH FOR JUSTICE OR WHY APPELLATE JUDGES SHOULD STAY HUMAN
    (pp. 50-86)

    IN MY CONCLUDING ESSAY I must try to reward the reader’s patience with earlier generalities by speaking of some more concrete concerns in the contemporary administration of justice. From the multitude available I have selected one group; in doing so I have had regard to four criteria. The first is the degree of importance for the whole legal order of the institution whose problematics are involved. The second is the degree of urgency of better understanding and handling of these problematics. The third is the degree to which these are likely to baffle us, unless we have adequate understanding and...

  6. Notes
    (pp. 87-114)
  7. Index
    (pp. 115-121)