Proposed: The University of the United States

Proposed: The University of the United States

EDGAR BRUCE WESLEY
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY LOTUS D. COFFMAN
Copyright Date: 1936
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 94
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttt98
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  • Book Info
    Proposed: The University of the United States
    Book Description:

    Proposed: The University of the United States was first published in 1936. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. In Proposed: The University of the United States, Edgar Bruce Wesley claims that a reduction in the number of bureaucrats and special advisers to the government, and fewer “blunders of national proportions,” would result from the establishment of a national university in Washington. Such a university would be devoted entirely to graduate and research work. Exchange professors and visiting scholars would contribute to its services. Students would pay no tuition fees since the institution, founded and directed by the federal government, would be supported by taxation. It would be empowered to grant the usual graduate degrees and much of its work would be in the training of promising young people for government service and in carrying on “a continuous and inclusive program of social research.” The establishment of a national university is not a new idea, as Professor Wesley explains, but one that has been proposed by numerous educators and statesmen, including ten presidents of the United States. This book relates the history of the idea, presents arguments in favor of the establishment of such an institution, outlines a plan for its organization, and presents a specific bill for enactment by Congress._x000B_

    eISBN: 978-1-4529-3853-0
    Subjects: Education

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-x)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. xi-2)
  3. I THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY MOVEMENT
    (pp. 3-24)

    The idea of a national university has one marked characteristic: it persists. Since 1787, when the first detailed proposal for its establishment was made, there has been, with the exception of one period, scarcely a year that has failed to bring forth articles, proposals, or bills pertaining to a national university. In fact, its proponents have been so numerous, their activities so varied, and their writings so prolific that a large book would be necessary for a detailed account. The principal efforts of the principal proponents of the national university, however, can be summarized in a few pages.

    The first...

  4. II THE INFLUENCE OF THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY IDEA
    (pp. 25-32)

    No account of the national university movement would be complete without some indication of the influence the idea has had upon various institutions. The validity of an idea is not always measured by its apparent success or apparent failure. So has it been with the movement to establish a national university. The proclaimed objective is still unattained, but the vitality and validity of the idea are evidenced by the several instances in which it has been invoked to bolster and support lesser objectives and less inclusive plans.

    Reference has already been made to Columbian College, which was founded in 1821...

  5. III REASONS FOR ESTABLISHING A NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
    (pp. 33-47)

    In the foregoing sections we have seen how the idea of a national university arose and how it has affected various institutions. Let us now summarize the reasons that caused Washington, Jefferson, Madison, John Quincy Adams, Hayes, Grant, and a host of other prominent men to devote their time and thought to such a cause. The reasons for establishing a national university may be grouped into two main classes—those broad principles which such a university would strengthen and the more specific functions which it would perform.

    A national university would help to maintain and promote democracy. Formal democracy has...

  6. IV INSTRUCTIONAL AND RESEARCH FACILITIES IN WASHINGTON
    (pp. 48-58)

    Since it is proposed to establish a graduate university in Washington, it may be well to examine the existing facilities for instruction and research. Such a survey will give some idea as to how they could be utilized in a national university.

    Instructional activities naturally fall into two types, official or public and unofficial or private. The unofficial instruction is carried on in the colleges and universities. Being a large city, Washington has the usual number of special, technical, and professional schools and colleges. Courses in art, science, and especially law are offered by several institutions. In addition to undergraduate...

  7. V A PLAN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF THE UNITED STATES
    (pp. 59-66)

    In the preceding sections some indication has been given of what the national university should be. Its main outlines are clear. It must be created by the national government; its support must come principally from the government; it must be located in Washington; it must be wholly a graduate and research institution; it must have pre-eminent leadership in national affairs; it must have close relations with the government; it must embrace all fields of knowledge; it must cooperate with existing institutions and organizations.

    No rigid plan for a national university should be drawn. Its main functions, its general organization, its...

  8. VI A BILL TO ESTABLISH THE UNIVERSITY OF THE UNITED STATES
    (pp. 67-72)

    Whereas, George Washington repeatedly urged upon Congress the desirability of establishing a national university and undertook to assure its establishment by leaving property for its endowment; and

    Whereas, seven other presidents have specifically recommended the establishment of such a university; and

    Whereas, justices of the Supreme Court, cabinet members, state officials, learned associations, and thousands of educators have indorsed the plan; and

    Whereas, the city of Washington is endowed with libraries, archives, laboratories, museums, and galleries whose extent and quality are unsurpassed; and

    Whereas, the need of encouraging advanced students and research workers to pursue their problems under the most...

  9. A BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY MOVEMENT
    (pp. 73-83)