Skip to Main Content
Have library access? Log in through your library
Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature

Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature

TERRY EAGLETON
FREDRIC JAMESON
EDWARD W. SAID
Introduction by SEAMUS DEANE
Copyright Date: 1990
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 112
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttx7m
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Nationalism, Colonialism, and Literature
    Book Description:

    The three essays constituting this volume were originally published as individual pamphlets by the Field Day Theatre Company, in Derry, Northern Ireland. Each deals with the question of nationalism and the role of cultural production as a force in understanding and analyzing the aftermath of colonization. The authors’ diverse perspectives are demonstrated by the essays’ respective titles: Eagleton, Nationalism: Irony and Commitment; Jameson, Modernism and Imperialism; and Said, Yeats and Decolonization. The essays have implication beyond their immediate topics, bearing upon questions of feminism, decolonization, and modernism to illuminate problems that belong to other groups and regions.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-8344-4
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

Export Selected Citations Export to NoodleTools Export to RefWorks Export to EasyBib Export a RIS file (For EndNote, ProCite, Reference Manager, Zotero, Mendeley...) Export a Text file (For BibTex)
  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-2)
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-20)
    SEAMUS DEANE

    The three essays presented here have in common with one another and with the Field Day enterprise the conviction that we need a new discourse for a new relationship between our idea of the human subject and our idea of human communities. What is now happening in Ireland, most especially in Northern Ireland (constitutionally an integral part of the United Kingdom), is only one of the many crises that have made the need for such a discourse peremptory. In Africa, South America, the Middle East, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe, the nature of the crisis is more glaringly exposed...

  4. NATIONALISM: IRONY AND COMMITMENT
    (pp. 23-40)
    TERRY EAGLETON

    ″Nationalism,″ remarks an African character in Raymond Williams′s novelSecond Generation(London, 1964), ″is in this sense like class. To have it, and to feel it, is the only way to end it. If you fail to claim it, or give it up too soon, you will merely be cheated, by other classes and other nations.″ Nationalism, like class, would thus seem to involve an impossible irony. It is sometimes forgotten that social class, for Karl Marx at least, is itself a form of alienation, canceling the particularity of an individual life into collective anonymity. Where Marx differs from the...

  5. MODERNISM AND IMPERIALISM
    (pp. 43-66)
    FREDRIC JAMESON

    This is a time in which, at least in part owing to what is called postmodernism, there seems to be renewed interest in finding out what modernism really was (note the past tense), and in rethinking that now historical phenomenon in new ways, which are not those we have inherited from the participants and the players, the advocates and the practitioners themselves. But this has also been a time, over perhaps an even longer span of years, in which the matter of what imperialismis(note the tense) and how it functions has been a subject of intense debate and...

  6. YEATS AND DECOLONIZATION
    (pp. 69-96)
    EDWARD W. SAID

    Yeats has now been almost completely assimilated to the canon as well as the discourses of modern English literature, in addition to those of European high modernism. Both of these institutions of course reckon with him as a great modern Irish poet, deeply affiliated and interacting with his native traditions, the historical and political context of his times, and the extraordinarily complex situation of being a poet in Ireland writing in English. Nevertheless, and despite Yeats′s obvious and, I would say, settled presence in Ireland, in British culture and literature, and in European modernism, he does present another fascinating aspect:...

  7. INDEX
    (pp. 99-102)
  8. Back Matter
    (pp. 103-103)