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Playwrights for Tomorrow

Playwrights for Tomorrow: A Collection of Plays, Volume 7

EDITED, WITH AN INTRODUCTION, BY ARTHUR H. BALLET
Alexander Hierholzer
David Ball
Seymour Leichman
Nancy Walter
Stephen Grecco
David Kranes
Copyright Date: 1971
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 232
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.cttttzct
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  • Book Info
    Playwrights for Tomorrow
    Book Description:

    This is the seventh volume in the series Playwrights for Tomorrow, which makes available collections of plays by dramatists who have participated in the program of the Office for Advanced Drama Research (O.A.D.R.) at the University of Minnesota. Arthur H. Ballet, the series editor, is the director of the O.A.D.R. Under the program of the O.A.D.R., promising playwrights are awarded grants and given the opportunity of having their plays produced by college, community, or experimental theatre groups. In his introduction to this volume Professor Ballet comments on the experience and progress of the O.A.D.R. program. He points out that the playwrights included here represent the first full year of O.A.D.R. work with the theatres in various parts of the country. Previously the productions of the plays under the O.A.D.R. program had been limited to theatrical groups in or near Minneapolis and St. Paul. The plays in this volume are Grace and George and God by Alexander Hierholzer, Assassin! by David Ball, Freddie the Pigeon by Seymour Leichman, Rags by Nancy Walter, The Orientals by Stephen Grecco, and Drive-In by David Kranes. Six delightful sketches by Mr. Leichman illustrate his play. Details about the initial productions of the plays and sidelights about the authors and their work are given by Professor Ballet in his introduction. The locales for the premieres of these plays included Cincinnati’s Playhouse in the Part, where two of the plays were given; the Firehouse Theatre in Minneapolis; Yale University’s Drama School; the Theatre in the Round, Minneapolis; and the theatre at Birmingham-Southern College in Alabama.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-6138-1
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

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  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iv])
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. [v]-2)
  3. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 3-6)
    Arthur H. Ballet

    In 1963 the Office for Advanced Drama Research (O.A.D.R.) was established at the University of Minnesota, with financial aid from the Rockefeller Foundation, its purpose being to provide an opportunity for playwrights to have new, experimental work performed in an atmosphere free from the pressures of the commercial theatre. Until 1969 productions supported by the O.A.D.R. were limited to the Minneapolis–St. Paul area, although its program has always drawn plays and writers from the entire country. With a renewed and expanded grant from the Rockefeller Foundation, the O.A.D.R. became national in its production activity, and its capability for underwriting...

  4. Grace and George and God
    (pp. 7-20)
    ALEXANDER HIERHOLZER

    At rise black lights reveal upstage many tall stylized flowers in bright luminescent colors, looking very innocently front. Offstage an organ plays “Bless This House” (in the style of Ethel Smith), and canaries sing brightly. The flowers slowly fade to the background as the general lighting rises, revealing up center the base of a large tree, rising far out of view. In the tree trunk, high above the stage level, is a Gothic cathedral window with stained glass of the same bright colors as the flowers. (At present the window is closed, unlighted, and unseen.) Down center, on its side,...

  5. Assassin! A FABLIAU IN TWO ACTS
    (pp. 21-76)
    DAVID BALL

    The stage for the entire play has a single setting of abstract design using shapes in space such as thin, irregular pillars; portals cut into the side and back walls; etc. Shapes rising from the stage floor are referred to as “pillars” in the script, although they may be designed in other ways. Attached to one of the pillars is a sign which says “MEN” on one side and “PHONE” on the other. Only one side is visible at a time; the sign may be flipped easily from one side to the other. It may also be moved out of...

  6. Freddie the Pigeon A TALE OF THE SECRET SERVICE FEATURING FREDDIE THE PIGEON, FELICIA DOILEY, AN ANGEL WITH AN IDENTITY CRISIS, OTIS THE CLOUD, AND VARIOUS VISUAL DEVICES
    (pp. 77-120)
    SEYMOUR LEICHMAN

    NARRATOR D

    (godlike voice) All the clouds are beautiful. They are beautiful to look at, and then, when they rain, they help humanity. They disappear for a while, but then they become vapor and rise up to become clouds again. That is the life cycle.

    NARRATOR M

    Wait a minute, Dan.

    NARRATOR D

    What is it, Mike?

    NARRATOR M

    Something strange is going on up here

    NARRATOR D

    What is it, Mike?

    NARRATOR M

    We’ve got a cloud up here that refuses to rain.

    NARRATOR D

    A cloud that won’t rain? Can you get close to him?

    NARRATOR M

    There...

  7. Characters from the Play
    (pp. None)
  8. Rags
    (pp. 121-162)
    NANCY WALTER

    1.The theatre is dark for a change. We are thrown back upon the ear. The actors come into the dark separately. It is Draves’s birth. The sounds of birth are made in the dark. Slowly at first and at regular intervals and then faster and louder and louder until the sounds are so close together they are one. Sudden light.

    MOM

    It’s him. It’s a boy.

    2.Under the grape trees. In the near dark, Mom chooses her family and arranges them. Ruby, Theresa, and Clement stand outside the family circle and beckon to Pop, Draves, and Lucy to come out....

  9. The Orientals
    (pp. 163-198)
    STEPHEN GRECCO

    A small third-floor efficiency in an old city brownstone. The back wall has two windows which look down upon the street. Between them a marble fireplace containing a makeshift bookcase instead of the customary andirons. Above the mantel a large oriental print; on the mantel, partially hidden by a stack of books, a pair of black opera glasses. In the room a large brass bed upper right, an easy chair and reading lamp down right, an overstuffed sofa down left, a bureau and a cage with a myna bird upper left. The apartment door, left, leads to a narrow hallway...

  10. Drive-In
    (pp. 199-215)
    DAVID KRANES

    The skeleton of an old car, vintage early 1950’s; the rest is cut away, allowing the easy throwing out of paper cups, candy wrappers, etc. It should resemble a large paintchipped insect. A drive-in speaker hangs on the frame. It is an evening in the present.

    At the curtain: The lights dim. The sound of cartoon music begins. Throughout the cartoon music, from time to time, occurs the “beep beep” of the cartoon roadrunner. The lights come up and reveal Bob and Bobbi sitting close together, watching the cartoon, bathed in a cinematic flicker, each drinking from a paper cup....