An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology

An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology: An Introduction

ANATOLY LIBERMAN
WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF J. LAWRENCE MITCHELL
Copyright Date: 2008
Edition: NED - New edition
Pages: 408
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5749/j.ctttv4dq
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  • Book Info
    An Analytic Dictionary of English Etymology
    Book Description:

    This work introduces renowned linguistics scholar Anatoly Liberman’s comprehensive dictionary and bibliography of the etymology of English words. This unique resource addresses fifty-five words traditionally dismissed as being of unknown etymology. Each entry is a full-fledged article, shedding light for the first time on the source of some of the most widely disputed word origins in the English language.

    eISBN: 978-0-8166-5408-6
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ABBREVIATIONS OF LINGUISTIC TERMS AND NAMES OF LANGUAGES
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Introduction THE PURPOSE AND CONTENT OF A NEW DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH ETYMOLOGY
    (pp. xi-xxxii)

    Disparaging statements like the one given in the epigraph above are many and at best mildly amusing. Richard Grant White wrote the following in his bookWords and their Uses Past and Present: A Study of the English Language(Boston and New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1899 [this is a revised and corrected edition], pp. 342–43):

    With one exception, Etymology is the least valuable element in the making of a dictionary, as it is of interest only to those who wish to study the history of language. It helps no man in his use of the wordbishopto...

  5. THE ETYMOLOGIES AT A GLANCE
    (pp. xxxiii-xlvi)

    The following etymologies aim at making the conclusions reached in the present volume easily available to those who are more interested in the results of the investigation than in going over conflicting hypotheses. They are also addressed to the etymological editors of “thick” dictionaries. The summaries will allow them to decide whether they want to read further and modify their entries in accordance with the solutions proposed here. “For many words, a thorough etymology can easily run to twenty or thirty pages of analysis. Obviously, no regular dictionary could allocate that much space for etymology. Nevertheless, most regular dictionaries could...

  6. AN ANALYTIC DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH ETYMOLOGY
    (pp. xlvii-232)

    1. The OE forms ofadz(e)areadesa(m) andadese(f) (recorded once).Adesa < adosa < adusa(Mercian) is due to the Old English rule of dissimilation of two back vowels in unstressed syllables;eadesain theVespasian Psalterhasea < *æby velar umlaut (SB [sec 50, note 1, and sec 142]; Luick [1964:sec 342, note 1; 347]; A. Campbell [1959:sec 385]). The spellingaddiceindicates that OE s rendered a voiceless fricative. The cause of the preservation of voicelessness is not clear. Owing to the position between two unstressed vowels? (so Luick [1964: 846]). One...

  7. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 233-312)
  8. INDEX OF SUBJECTS
    (pp. 313-316)
  9. INDEX OF WORDS
    (pp. 317-348)
  10. INDEX OF PERSONAL AND PLACE NAMES
    (pp. 349-360)
  11. Back Matter
    (pp. 361-363)