Countering Piracy in the Modern Era

Countering Piracy in the Modern Era: Notes from a RAND Workshop to Discuss the Best Approaches for Dealing with Piracy in the 21st Century

Peter Chalk
Laurence Smallman
Nicholas Burger
Copyright Date: 2009
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 22
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/cf269osd
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  • Book Info
    Countering Piracy in the Modern Era
    Book Description:

    In March 2009, the RAND Corporation convened a small group of experts from the U.S. government, allied partner nations, the maritime industry, and academic organizations to discuss piracy in the modern era. Participants concluded that mitigating the complex nature of maritime crime requires the input of all stakeholders--state, national, private, and nongovernmental--and must embrace measures beyond the reactive deployment of naval assets.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-4904-9
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. A Note on Compilation
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Conference Flyer
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xi-xii)
  7. Abbreviations
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  8. Countering Piracy in the Modern Era: Notes from a RAND Workshop to Discuss the Best Approaches for Dealing with Piracy in the 21st Century
    (pp. 1-8)

    Piracyis defined in international law as an illicit endeavor that takes place on the high seas and which must involve at least two ships.¹ It is generally understood as a crime of universal jurisdiction, meaning all states have the right and responsibility to detain and/or arrest any person who is caught in the prosecution of the act. While this legal framework would seem to provide an adequate basis for prosecuting pirates, its practical application depends on whether national governments have sufficient domestic legislation and political will to actually bring pirates to justice—and many do not. The current situation...