Developing and Testing Informed-Consent Methods in a Study of the Elderly in Mexico

Developing and Testing Informed-Consent Methods in a Study of the Elderly in Mexico

Emma Aguila
Maria Dolores Cervera
Homero Martinez
Beverly A. Weidmer
Copyright Date: 2015
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 40
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt14bs1hg
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Developing and Testing Informed-Consent Methods in a Study of the Elderly in Mexico
    Book Description:

    This report documents the process one research team developed to obtain informed consent from those choosing to participate in the research, norms and regulations for conducting research involving human subjects in the United States and Mexico, and how the team developed and tested a culturally sensitive approach for collecting informed consent among the elderly in Yucatan.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8913-7
    Subjects: Sociology, History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Figures and Table
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Summary
    (pp. ix-xii)

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for older adults, the government of the state of Yucatan, Mexico, and the RAND Corporation collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a noncontributory pension program for people age 70 and older. This program included an evaluation component to test its impact. The impact-evaluation component included a survey of randomly selected people age 70 and older and members of their households. These surveys collected data on demographic characteristics and detailed information on individual and household income and assets, expenditures, employment history, self-reported health status and physical functioning, social networks, and physical activity,...

  6. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  7. Abbreviations
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  8. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for older adults, the government of the state of Yucatan, Mexico, and the RAND Corporation collaborated to design, implement, and evaluate a noncontributory pension program for people age 70 and older (Aguila, Kapteyn, et al., forthcoming; and Aguila, Borges, et al., forthcoming). Yucatan, in southeastern Mexico (Figure 1.1), is somewhat similar to the rest of Mexico in two ways of interest. First, statistics from the National Institute for Statistics and Geography (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía, or INEGI), indicate that, in 2010, Yucatan had an older population (at least 60...

  9. CHAPTER TWO Norms and Regulations for Human-Subject Research in Mexico and the United States
    (pp. 5-12)

    Our research, as noted, involved a collaboration between the government of Yucatan and the RAND Corporation. In addition to ensuring that those participating in the study had adequate protection and provided meaningful informed consent, we had to satisfy both U.S. and Mexican norms and regulations.

    In this chapter, we review how we sought to ensure that participants’ consent was informed, as well as how we sought to address relevant norms and regulations and the issues raised during the process of developing the informed-consent protocols for the evaluation research. We begin by providing an overview of the primary concerns for protecting...

  10. CHAPTER THREE Developing and Testing Informed-Consent Methods Among the Elderly in Yucatan
    (pp. 13-18)

    As noted, we faced four challenges in developing informed-consent procedures and forms for this project. First, and above all, of course, we had to protect the interests and confidentiality of those participating in our research. Second, we had to consider the specific context and setting for this project and, in particular, the characteristics of our target population, elderly persons in a Spanish-speaking country, many of whom spoke only Mayan or spoke Spanish only as a second language, or, even if speaking Spanish, had low levels of education or even literacy. Third, given low levels of education and literacy among many...

  11. CHAPTER FOUR Conclusion
    (pp. 19-20)

    In Mexico, as elsewhere, informed-consent documents often use language that exceeds the reading and comprehension skills of participants, thus making it difficult for them to understand. Gaining informed consent from elderly adults presents additional challenges stemming from their physical frailty, reduced autonomy and privacy (it is not unusual for the elderly in Mexico to live with their children or other family members who act as guardians or gatekeepers), impaired decisionmaking abilities, cognitive impairment, or neuropsychiatric illnesses. Obtaining meaningful informed consent may also be difficult when the potential research participant is functionally illiterate or cannot read the language in which the...

  12. Appendixes
    (pp. 21-22)
  13. References
    (pp. 23-24)