High-Priority Information Technology Needs for Law Enforcement

High-Priority Information Technology Needs for Law Enforcement

John S. Hollywood
John E. Boon
Richard Silberglitt
Brian G. Chow
Brian A. Jackson
Copyright Date: 2015
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 94
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt14bs4kz
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  • Book Info
    High-Priority Information Technology Needs for Law Enforcement
    Book Description:

    This study reports on strategic planning activities supporting the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) in the area of information technology, collecting and analyzing data on law enforcement needs and identifying potential solutions through technology assessment studies, extensive outreach and liaison activities, and subject matter expert panels.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8957-1
    Subjects: Political Science, Law, Technology, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Figures
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Tables
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xi-xvi)

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has a unique position in the federal government. NIJ is tasked to serve as the national focal point for work on criminal justice technology by the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and to conduct programs to “improve the safety and effectiveness of law enforcement technology and improve access to such technology by Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies.” To carry out this mission, NIJ pursues a wide range of activities, from identifying practitioners’ needs to assessing available technology solutions; providing information, liaison, and outreach to enable matching technology applications to priority needs; engaging...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xix-xx)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction to the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center Information and Geospatial Technology Centerʹs Strategic Planning Activities
    (pp. 1-24)

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has a unique position in the federal government. NIJ (specifically, the NIJ Office of Science and Technology [OST]) is tasked to serve as the national focal point for work on criminal justice technology by the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Section 232). NIJ OST is also tasked, in the same section, to conduct programs that “improve the safety and effectiveness of law enforcement technology and improve access to such technology by Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies.” To carry out this mission, NIJ is assigned duties including the following: provide recommendations to the...

  10. CHAPTER TWO Information Technology Needs for Law Enforcement
    (pp. 25-50)

    Table 2.1 presents the complete list of all information technology needs for law enforcement, generated and prioritized from the studies described in the previous chapter. Needs are presented by technology area (specifically, top technology taxonomy division as shown in Figure 1.1), in alphabetical order:

    Facility Operations Technologies

    Information Analysis

    Information Collection (Including Surveillance)

    Information Delivery (Including Communications)

    Information Management (Including Information-Sharing)

    Management/Knowledge Development and Training

    Personnel Clothing, Protection, or Augmentation

    Weapons and Force.

    Within technology-area tables, needs are sorted first by technology class (again, coming from the technology taxonomy) and then by priority, with higher-ranked needs presented first. That said,...

  11. CHAPTER THREE Findings and Recommendations
    (pp. 51-64)

    All of the needs described in the previous chapter can be thought of as “individual recommendations,” in that all are drawn from direct practitioner input or technical studies and might inform a funder’s or developer’s decisions about which S&T efforts to pursue next. In this concluding chapter, we take a more holistic approach, looking across the needs to identify patterns and develop some overarching recommendations that come from the identified needs as a group.

    We identify major themes in the law enforcement IT needs, and we also summarize, in general, what has been done related to these themes to date...

  12. APPENDIX Information Technology Capability Demand and Supply Analysis: Results of the Market Survey
    (pp. 65-70)
  13. Bibliography
    (pp. 71-74)