Adults Newly Exposed to "Know the Signs" Campaign Report Greater Gains in Confidence to Intervene with Those Who Might Be at Risk for Suicide Than Those Unexposed to the Campaign

Adults Newly Exposed to "Know the Signs" Campaign Report Greater Gains in Confidence to Intervene with Those Who Might Be at Risk for Suicide Than Those Unexposed to the Campaign

Rajeev Ramchand
Elizabeth Roth
Joie D. Acosta
Nicole K. Eberhart
Copyright Date: 2015
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 3
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt15sk8hx
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  • Book Info
    Adults Newly Exposed to "Know the Signs" Campaign Report Greater Gains in Confidence to Intervene with Those Who Might Be at Risk for Suicide Than Those Unexposed to the Campaign
    Book Description:

    Presents results of a one-year follow-up to a survey on Know the Signs, a California mass media suicide prevention campaign, and examines the effect of campaign exposure on respondents’ confidence to intervene with someone at risk for suicide.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-9125-3
    Subjects: Psychology, History, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Adults Newly Exposed to the ʺKnow the Signsʺ Campaign Report Greater Gains in Confidence to Intervene with Those Who Might Be at Risk for Suicide Than Those Unexposed to the Campaign
    (pp. 1-3)
    Rajeev Ramchand, Elizabeth Roth, Joie D. Acosta and Nicole K. Eberhart

    Previously, we reported about “Know the Signs,” a mass media suicide prevention campaign that was part of California’s statewide prevention and early intervention activities funded under Proposition 63. Through broad dissemination of the slogan “Pain isn’t always obvious” via television, online, and print advertisements, as well as billboards, Californians were encouraged to visit the Know the Signs (KTS) website (www.suicideispreventable.org) and learn about the warning signs for suicide and resources available to help. In a representative survey of 2,568 California adults ages 18 years and older—administered in May–September 2013 as part of RAND’s Proposition 63 evaluation activities—35...