Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military: Annex to Volume 2. Tabular Results from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study for Department of Defense Service Members

Andrew R. Morral
Kristie L. Gore
Terry L. Schell
Copyright Date: 2015
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 446
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt15sk8x4
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military
    Book Description:

    The Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office asked the RAND Corporation to conduct an independent assessment of the rates of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the U.S. military. This Annex to Volume 2 contains detailed tabular results for the DoD active component from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-9130-7
    Subjects: Management & Organizational Behavior, Sociology, Law

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. The 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study Team
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Preface
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-xxiv)
  5. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxv-xxvi)
  6. Statistical Analysis and Reporting Conventions Used in This Report
    (pp. 1-2)
  7. PART A Sexual Assault:: Detailed Results
    • A.1. Percentage of members who experienced any type of unwanted event of an abusive, humiliating, or sexual nature
      (pp. 5-5)
    • A.2. Percentage of members who experienced a sexual assault in their lifetime
      (pp. 6-6)
    • A.3. Percentage of members who experienced a sexual assault since joining the military
      (pp. 7-7)
    • A.4. Number of different sexual assaults experienced in the past year among members who experienced a sexual assault
      (pp. 8-11)
    • A.5. Number of offenders in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 12-15)
    • A.6. Type of single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 16-19)
    • A.7. Gender of offender(s) in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 20-23)
    • A.8. Percentage of members who knew the offender(s) in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 24-26)
    • A.9. Relationship of offender(s) to victim in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and knew the offender(s)
      (pp. 27-33)
    • A.10. Identity of offender(s) in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 34-40)
    • A.11. Highest rank of offender(s) in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and indicated the offender(s) included someone in the military
      (pp. 41-44)
    • A.12. Percentage of members who indicated that the offender was an officer in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and indicated that the offender(s) included someone in the military
      (pp. 45-48)
    • A.13. Offender was respondents’ unit leader or someone in their chain of command in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and indicated that the offender was a higher rank
      (pp. 49-52)
    • A.14. Location of the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 53-59)
    • A.15. Situational context of the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 60-66)
    • A.16. Percentage of the single or most serious assaults considered to be hazing among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 67-69)
    • A.17. Stalking and/or harassment by the offender before or after the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 70-73)
    • A.18. Involvement of alcohol and/or drugs in the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 74-80)
    • A.19. Consequences of the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 81-85)
    • A.20. Percentage of members who told someone about the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 86-88)
    • A.21. Person(s) whom members told about the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 89-95)
    • A.22. Percentage of members who had a forensic exam following the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a penetrative sexual assault in the past year and told someone about it
      (pp. 96-98)
    • A.23. Satisfaction with treatment following the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 99-103)
    • A.24. Percentage of members who officially reported the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 104-106)
    • A.25. Type of official report among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and made an official report to the military
      (pp. 107-110)
    • A.26. Reporting preference among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and made an unrestricted report or a restricted report that turned into an unrestricted report
      (pp. 111-113)
    • A.27. Percentage of members who were interviewed by an investigator about the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 114-116)
    • A.28. Whether or not a suspect was arrested for the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 117-120)
    • A.29. Reasons for reporting the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and made an official report to the military
      (pp. 121-127)
    • A.30. Reasons for not reporting the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and did not officially report it to the military
      (pp. 128-141)
    • A.31. Main reason for not reporting the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and did not officially report it to the military
      (pp. 142-155)
    • A.32. Percentage of members who would make the same reporting decision again among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 156-158)
    • A.33. Rates of perceived retaliation or negative career actions following the single or most serious assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 159-165)
    • A.34. Sources of perceived social retaliation among members who indicated social retaliation following the single or most serious sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 166-169)
    • A.35. Members who completed a Victim Reporting Preference Statement for any sexual assault among members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year
      (pp. 170-173)
    • A.36. Types of services offered to members who experienced a sexual assault in the past year and completed a Victim Reporting Preference Statement
      (pp. 174-178)
  8. PART B Sexual Harassment and Gender Discrimination:: Detailed Results
    • B.1. Percentage of members who experienced a sexually hostile work environment in the past year
      (pp. 181-181)
    • B.2. Percentage of members who experienced sexual quid pro quo in the past year
      (pp. 182-182)
    • B.3. Percentage of members who experienced sexual harassment in the past year
      (pp. 183-183)
    • B.4. Percentage of members who experienced gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 184-184)
    • B.5. Percentage of members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 185-185)
    • B.6. Percentage of members who experienced each type of sexual harassment or gender discrimination violation in the past year
      (pp. 186-200)
    • B.7. Percentage who labeled the event(s) as sexual harassment among members who experienced sexual harassment in the past year
      (pp. 201-204)
    • B.8. Number of offenders involved in the sexual harassment or gender discrimination among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 205-211)
    • B.9. Gender of the offender(s) among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 212-218)
    • B.10. Workplace role of the offender(s) among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 219-225)
    • B.11. Military status of the offender(s) among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 226-232)
    • B.12. Military rank of the offender(s) among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year by another service member
      (pp. 233-239)
    • B.13. Duration of the upsetting behavior among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 240-243)
    • B.14. Location of the upsetting behavior among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 244-247)
    • B.15. Consequences of sexual harassment and discrimination among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 248-254)
    • B.16. Disclosure among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year
      (pp. 255-261)
    • B.17. Leadership actions taken in response to the disclosure among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year and disclosed it to a supervisor, leader, or official
      (pp. 262-275)
    • B.18. Satisfaction with the leadership response among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year and disclosed it to a supervisor, leader, or official
      (pp. 276-282)
    • B.19. Reasons for not disclosing among members who experienced sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the past year and did not disclose it to a supervisor, leader, or official
      (pp. 283-296)
  9. PART C Beliefs About Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment Prevalence, Prevention, and Progress:: Detailed Results
    • C.1. Perception of safety at home duty station
      (pp. 299-302)
    • C.2. Perception of safety away from home duty station
      (pp. 303-306)
    • C.3. Perception of how common sexual harassment is in the military
      (pp. 307-309)
    • C.4. Perception of how common discrimination against women is in the military
      (pp. 310-312)
    • C.5. Perceived likelihood that sexual harassment in the military would be reported
      (pp. 313-316)
    • C.6. Perceived likelihood that reports of sexual harassment in the military would be acted upon
      (pp. 317-320)
    • C.7. Perceived likelihood that sexual assault in the military would be reported
      (pp. 321-324)
    • C.8. Perceived likelihood that a reported sexual assault in the military would be investigated
      (pp. 325-328)
    • C.9. Perceived likelihood that someone who committed a sexual assault in the military would be punished
      (pp. 329-332)
    • C.10. Perceived likelihood of respondent taking specific actions related to sexual assault or harassment
      (pp. 333-346)
    • C.11. Percentage who observed a situation they believed was, or could have led to, a sexual assault
      (pp. 347-349)
    • C.12. Type of bystander intervention behaviors taken among members who observed a situation they believed was, or could have led to, a sexual assault
      (pp. 350-356)
    • C.13. Perceptions of unit leadership regarding sexual assault and harassment
      (pp. 357-370)
    • C.14. Exposure to sexual assault prevention and response training
      (pp. 371-373)
    • C.15. Perception of sexual assault prevention and response training
      (pp. 374-394)
    • C.16. Exposure to sexual harassment training
      (pp. 395-397)
    • C.17. Perception of bystander responsibilities and trust in the military system
      (pp. 398-411)
    • C.18. Perceived trends in sexual harassment and sexual assault
      (pp. 412-420)