Capabilities-Based Planning for Energy Security at Department of Defense Installations

Capabilities-Based Planning for Energy Security at Department of Defense Installations

Constantine Samaras
Henry H. Willis
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 60
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt2jc9g1
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  • Book Info
    Capabilities-Based Planning for Energy Security at Department of Defense Installations
    Book Description:

    Department of Defense (DoD) installations rely on the commercial electricity grid for 99 percent of their electricity needs, but the U.S. electricity grid is vulnerable to disruption from natural hazards and actor-induced outages, such as physical or cyber attacks. Using portfolio analysis methods for assessing capability options, this paper presents a framework to evaluate choices among energy security strategies for DoD installations.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-7913-8
    Subjects: Political Science, Business, Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Figures
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Tables
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xi-xvi)

    Extensive energy delivery outages in 2012, such as the widespread electricity, natural gas, and refined oil product disruptions due to Hurricane Sandy; the summer weather related outages in the Washington, D.C., area; and the largest blackout in global history in India, have reinforced public and policymaker awareness of risks to the electricity infrastructure system. The U.S. electricity grid is vulnerable to disruptions from natural hazards and actor-induced outages, such as physical or cyber attacks.

    Since Department of Defense (DoD) installations in the United States rely on the commercial electricity grid for 99 percent of their electricity needs, nearly all critical...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xix-xx)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-6)

    Since Department of Defense (DoD) installations in the United States rely on the commercial electricity grid for 99 percent of their electricity needs, nearly all critical functions on installations depend on infrastructure outside DoD’s control (Stockton, 2011a). Beyond their normal military functions, these installations would be a base for emergency services after some natural or human-caused disasters. The 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review therefore identified diversifying energy sources and increasing efficiency in DoD operations as critical goals (DoD, 2010), and energy security has reemerged as a priority throughout the department. As one aspect of this, DoD is evaluating various strategies to...

  10. CHAPTER TWO Using Joint Capability Areas to Inform Installation Energy Security Decisions
    (pp. 7-10)

    DoD analysts planning for installation energy security rely on the broad energy security definition established in the 2012 National Defense Authorization Act—assured access, reliable supplies, and sufficient energy to meet mission essential requirements, as described in Chapter One. The remaining challenges for decision makers throughout DoD are operationalizing and acting on these concepts. In this chapter, we discuss the initial task of measuring installation energy security and outline how DoD Joint Capability Areas might serve as a basis for these measures. This type of exercise can and should be undertaken for each installation individually, but a broader, DoD-wide capabilities...

  11. CHAPTER THREE Developing a Capabilities-Based Approach for Evaluating Energy Security Decisions
    (pp. 11-26)

    DoD is currently engaged in evaluating installation energy security strategies, an undertaking that will need to incorporate technological, economic, and operational uncertainties. In Chapter Two, we proposed adapting DoD Joint Capabilities Areas as the foundation for measuring energy security at installations. In this chapter, we build on this concept and describe how a capabilities-based planning approach for evaluating energy security strategies at U.S.-based installations could be performed.

    Capabilities-based planning (CBP) means different things to different people and some aspects of its implementation in DoD have been appropriately controversial. Previous RAND work has defined CBP as planning under uncertainty to provide...

  12. CHAPTER FOUR Conclusions
    (pp. 27-28)

    U.S. installations will face rising requirements for energy security going forward, as installations increasingly directly support military operations from inside the United States. In addition to providing military capabilities, installation energy services also enable DoD to support the Department of Homeland Security’s response to disasters and terrorist attacks. Our intention with this think piece is to stimulate a discussion of how DoD installation energy services contribute to homeland defense and homeland security, how DoD can evaluate choices to maintain adequate energy services to critical missions located in the United States, and how DoD can make tradeoff decisions to maintain these...

  13. APPENDIX Relevant Joint Capability Areas Served by Installation Energy Services
    (pp. 29-36)
  14. Bibliography
    (pp. 37-40)