An Outline of Strategies for Building an Innovation System for Knowledge City

An Outline of Strategies for Building an Innovation System for Knowledge City

Keith Crane
Howard J. Shatz
Shanthi Nataraj
Steven W. Popper
Xiao Wang
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 98
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt3fh0cd
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  • Book Info
    An Outline of Strategies for Building an Innovation System for Knowledge City
    Book Description:

    Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City is a planned environmentally and technologically advanced city in China’s Guangzhou Development District that will host innovative industries and their workers. This report serves as an outline for a set of strategies for Knowledge City and is intended to help the developers create conditions that are conducive to innovation and the commercialization of new technologies.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-7973-2
    Subjects: Business, Technology, History, Economics

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
    Keith Crane
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Figures
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Tables
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xi-xxii)

    China’s Guangzhou Development District (GDD) is focused on creating an environment conducive to innovation in a new development called Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City (see Figure S.1). Jointly developed by GDD and Singbridge of Singapore, Knowledge City is to be a new environmentally and technologically advanced city that hosts innovative industries and their associated knowledge workers. The project is designed to spur the transformation of Guangzhou from less-complex manufacturing to higher-wage research- and innovation-based knowledge industries.

    When completed, Knowledge City will be one of several components of GDD, a specially designated economic district in the Luogang District of Guangzhou. GDD includes...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxv-xxvi)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-10)

    China’s Guangzhou Development District (GDD) is focused on creating an environment conducive to innovation in a new development called Sino-Singapore Guangzhou Knowledge City (see Figure 1.1). Jointly developed by GDD and Singbridge of Singapore, Knowledge City is to be a new environmentally and technologically advanced city that hosts innovative industries and their associated knowledge workers. With a planned area of 123 square kilometers, much of which will be green space, Knowledge City will be larger than Vancouver, Canada (115 square kilometers), or Paris (105 square kilometers). The project is designed to spur the transformation of Guangzhou from less-complex manufacturing to...

  10. CHAPTER TWO Attracting High-Technology Companies and Enabling Their Growth
    (pp. 11-28)

    This chapter presents actions for GDD to pursue to attract high-technology companies and enable their growth. These actions can be grouped into two domains:

    attracting an anchor institution and marketing Knowledge City

    improving the overall environment for innovation rather than only targeting specific sectors.

    This chapter briefly reviews and assesses GDD’s assets and the assets that Knowledge City is likely to have that will help it attract and retain high-technology companies. It then provides details on the two domains and outlines the actions that GDD should take to capitalize on its assets and improve its ability to attract and retain...

  11. CHAPTER THREE Attracting and Retaining People
    (pp. 29-44)

    This chapter recommends actions for GDD to pursue to attract and retain highly skilled, innovative people. The actions can be grouped into two domains:

    actions that enhance the quality of life in Knowledge City

    actions that attract talent and build networks.

    GDD and Guangzhou have been attractive locations for the types of people who will establish and work in the innovative companies of Knowledge City. GDD has a base of serial entrepreneurs, people with experience starting technology companies. In the GDD-RAND Knowledge City Project Survey, almost half of respondents said that they had previously started a company. The majority of...

  12. CHAPTER FOUR Financing
    (pp. 45-52)

    Innovation-friendly financing forms the third pillar of an innovation system, supported by the legal, regulatory, and business support systems. Recommended actions are in two domains:

    encouraging greater availability of innovation-oriented financing

    improving other forms of financing.

    This chapter briefly describes the financing challenges for high-technology firms in GDD and Knowledge City. The recommended actions are designed to make available the necessary financing on a commercial basis with appropriate regard to risk.

    GDD has worked hard to create financing opportunities for innovative companies. For example, it has set up Guangzhou GET Co. Ltd., GDD’s venture capital firm, and the Zhongke Baiyun...

  13. CHAPTER FIVE Priorities, Ease of Implementation, and Sequencing
    (pp. 53-56)

    The recommendations in this report consist of a coordinated set of actions. Given limited resources, it will typically not be possible or even desirable to implement all of these initiatives at the same time. However, taking some of these actions at an early stage (for example, hiring a marketing or recruitment firm) can help facilitate other, later actions (for example, attracting returnees).

    We ranked these recommended actions on three dimensions. Table 5.1 pairs each action with one of the three pillars of an innovation system: attracting companies and enabling their growth, attracting and retaining highly skilled people, and ensuring the...

  14. CHAPTER SIX Indicators of Innovation
    (pp. 57-62)

    To ensure that Knowledge City makes steady progress toward the goal of creating and encouraging growth among high-technology firms, progress will need to be measured. Ideally, one would directly measure progress toward the desired goal of growth among high-technology firms. However, because achieving this goal may take some time, it is also important to measure progress toward creating the necessary inputs. If sufficient progress is not being made toward the goal, then measuring progress toward the creation of inputs can shed light on which elements of the innovation environment should be targeted for improvement.

    In Table 6.1, we present 12...

  15. APPENDIX Contents of Creating an Innovation System for Knowledge City
    (pp. 63-68)
  16. References
    (pp. 69-72)