Exploring the Association Between Military Base Neighborhood Characteristics and Soldiers' and Airmen's Outcomes

Exploring the Association Between Military Base Neighborhood Characteristics and Soldiers' and Airmen's Outcomes

Sarah O. Meadows
Laura L. Miller
Jeremy N. V. Miles
Gabriella C. Gonzalez
Brandon T. Dues
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 164
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt3fh17x
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  • Book Info
    Exploring the Association Between Military Base Neighborhood Characteristics and Soldiers' and Airmen's Outcomes
    Book Description:

    This report explores the applicability of neighborhood theory and social indicators research to understanding the quality of life in and around military bases. It also highlights gaps in neighborhood study methodology that need to be addressed in future research. Finally, it outlines how a more in-depth neighborhood analysis of military installations could be conducted.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-7882-7
    Subjects: Population Studies, Business, Environmental Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. Figures
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. Tables
    (pp. xi-xii)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xiii-xvi)

    Current extended military engagements in foreign nations have taken their toll on U.S. service members and their families. As a result, the services have made renewed commitments to support the needs of the families of military personnel. Quality of life and family programs across the services continue to grow, including recent efforts designed both to support service members and their families across the deployment cycle and to instill resiliency even before they face a deployment. For example, both the Army and the Air Force have adopted community covenants (Donley, 2009; U.S. Army OneSource, undated). Community covenants are designed to develop...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xix-xx)
  9. Chapter One. Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    Since September 11, 2001, the all-volunteer force (AVF) has experienced the strains of extended warfare. Combat deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan have taken their toll on service members and their families (Burrell et al., 2006; Chandra et al., 2010; Hosek, Kavanagh, and Miller, 2006; Lipari et al., 2010; Spera, 2009; Tanielian and Jaycox, 2008). Quality-of-life (QOL) and family programs across the services continue to grow, including recent efforts designed to support service members and their families across the deployment cycle and to instill resiliency even before they face a deployment (Decision Engineering Associates, 2002; Jowers, 2007; MacDermid, Samper, et al.,...

  10. Chapter Two. Neighborhood Studies and Social Indicators Research
    (pp. 5-26)

    This chapter provides an overview of the growing field of neighborhood studies, as well as the related field of social indicators research. Thus, it serves as background material for our study and as an introduction to these literatures for those who are unfamiliar with them. This chapter presents the basic theories behind the methodologies, previous approaches to this work, measures that have been developed, and relationships between neighborhoods and health that have been demonstrated thus far. We also highlight gaps in the neighborhood studies literature that are relevant for the mobile military population; these gaps also apply to nonmilitary populations....

  11. Chapter Three. Data and Methods
    (pp. 27-38)

    This chapter describes the data and methods used to select Army and Air Force installations for this study and to define their neighborhoods geographically. This chapter also details the data and methods applied in the creation of the military neighborhood ranking index (MNRI). Finally, we provide a brief description of the Army and Air Force data sets used in the subsequent two chapters to analyze the association between MNRI scores and Soldier and Airman health and well-being outcomes.

    In this study, we focus on Army and Air Force installations located within the 50 United States. We limited the sample to...

  12. Chapter Four. Case Study 1: U.S. Army Installations
    (pp. 39-56)

    This chapter presents results from our case study using data from the Army. First, we present data on the 36 Army installations used for the Army military neighborhoods. Second, we use Census data to rank those military base neighborhoods across six domains, as well as the overall MNRI. Third, we provide an overview of a select group of military neighborhoods that ranked highest and lowest on the overall MNRI. Fourth, we use multilevel modeling to link the six domains, as well as the overall MNRI, to three Soldier outcomes: attrition (i.e., leaving before the end of a Soldier’s term of...

  13. Chapter Five. Case Study 2: U.S. Air Force Bases
    (pp. 57-84)

    This chapter presents results from our case study using data from the Air Force.

    We had access to a different type of data for the Air Force case study than we did for the Army. Although we used personnel data files for the Army, with the Air Force, we used self-reported demographics, attitudes, and assessments from a survey of Air Force personnel. These data provide information, at the individual level, that more closely aligns with the neighborhood studies research literature because they include more health-related outcomes.

    The survey data also allow us to address the issue of exposure that we...

  14. Chapter Six. Recommendations for Neighborhood Studies in General and for Future Research on Military Neighborhoods
    (pp. 85-98)

    Our intent with this exploratory study was to provide a research framework that scholars could use to inform military leaders, policymakers, and service providers about how sociodemographic and economic characteristics of installations and their surrounding neighborhoods may be associated with military members’ health, well-being, and satisfaction with military life. The purpose is to identify those locations where service members may be particularly dependent on installation services because of neighborhood-based stressors or because of the lack of neighborhood resources. This information can help the military adapt its programs and services to address location-specific need (such as greater employment support for spouses...

  15. Appendix A. Detailed Army Results
    (pp. 99-110)
  16. Appendix B. Detailed Air Force Results
    (pp. 111-126)
  17. References
    (pp. 127-144)