District of Columbia Community Health Needs Assessment

District of Columbia Community Health Needs Assessment

Anita Chandra
Janice C. Blanchard
Teague Ruder
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 118
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt4cgdvq
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  • Book Info
    District of Columbia Community Health Needs Assessment
    Book Description:

    This report guides the District of Columbia Healthy Communities Collaborative’s decisions about where and how to allocate resources and implement appropriate health interventions for the population it serves. The community health needs assessment described in this report includes quantitative analysis of existing demographic, health status, and hospital service use data for the District of Columbia, as well as analysis of current stakeholder perspectives, health policy, and investment priorities.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8200-8
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. Figures
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. Tables
    (pp. xi-xii)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xiii-xx)

    The DCHCC represents a unique collaboration among four D.C.-area hospitals (Children’s National Medical Center, Howard University Hospital, Providence Hospital, and Sibley Memorial Hospital) and two FQHCs (Community of Hope and Unity). In spring 2013, an additional community health center—Bread for the City—joined the DCHCC membership. In response to its community commitment, current economic challenges, and new federal guidelines, DCHCC set forth to conduct a CHNA that summarizes and evaluates community health needs with attention to health status, health service needs, and the input of community stakeholders. CHNAs are increasingly used to lay a factual foundation for community health...

  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xxi-xxii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    The District of Columbia (D.C.) Healthy Communities Collaborative (DCHCC) represents a unique collaboration between four D.C.-area hospitals (Children’s National Medical Center, Howard University Hospital, Providence Hospital, and Sibley Memorial Hospital) and two Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) (Community of Hope and Unity). In spring 2013, an additional community health center—Bread for the City—joined the DCHCC membership. In response to its community commitment, current economic challenges, and new federal guidelines, DCHCC set forth to conduct a Community Health Needs Assessment (CHNA) that summarizes and evaluates community health needs with attention to health status, health service needs, and the input...

  10. CHAPTER TWO Sociodemographic Characteristics and Trends in the District
    (pp. 5-10)

    This chapter briefly describes the demographic characteristics of District residents. The analyses are based on data from the 2000 and 2010 Decennial Censuses, as well as the annual ACSY through 2011.¹ Section 2.2 presents sociodemographic characteristics of District residents by ward and over time.

    The District is composed of 100 zip codes, and is divided into 8 wards corresponding to electoral districts (Figure 2.1). However, there are only 22 core residential ZIP codes; the rest are unique to office buildings, universities, military bases, or post office boxes. In this report, we present data by ward, using ward–to–ZIP code...

  11. CHAPTER THREE Health and Health Risk Behaviors in the District
    (pp. 11-38)

    In this chapter, we use a number of data sources to present health indicators for District residents. We principally relied on BRFSS and YRBS data to document health status. The BRFSS and YRBS are key sources of health status data, which provide information about a wide range of health behaviors, including drug and alcohol use, smoking, nutrition, physical activity, and injury. In addition, we compiled information from existing reports published by the District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to present statistics both for the city overall and by ward for...

  12. CHAPTER FOUR Access to and Use of Health Services
    (pp. 39-64)

    We use data from three sources to describe access to care among adults and children in the District. First, we summarize the self-reported use of care from available survey data—the BRFSS (for adults). Second, we use information on inpatient and ED discharges from District hospitals to demonstrate the rates at which these services are used. In addition, these data allow us to identify trends in hospitalization that are sensitive to the availability and efficacy of primary care. Finally, we provide summary data from FQHCs.

    We use the 2011 BRFSS data to illustrate the use of preventive services among adult...

  13. CHAPTER FIVE Stakeholder Perspectives
    (pp. 65-76)

    To elucidate findings from our administrative and survey data analysis, we conducted focus groups with key stakeholders who are advocates or providers of health and social services. We did not include community residents, as those groups were surveyed by DOH, and this report focused on recommendations that could be implemented by organizations (hence the inclusion of organization leaders). The primary objectives of these focus groups were:

    to identify priority health and health care issues, as well as critical service needs to which stakeholders feel greater investment should be targeted

    to understand how social determinants impact health and health service use...

  14. CHAPTER SIX Conclusions
    (pp. 77-84)

    In this section, we highlight our key findings in priority areas and identify gaps in knowledge. We determined priority areas using a combination of quantitative (administrative, survey) and qualitative (focus group) data analysis, as well as considering broader national health priority areas, paying particular attention to issues that have persisted over the last decade or experienced a recent increase or spike in the District. For example, we reviewed prior health needs assessments conducted in the District, exploring the trends in specific conditions or diagnoses. If those conditions persisted or assumed a new trend, we categorized them in the priority list....

  15. APPENDIX A Top 20 Primary Conditions for Inpatient and ED Discharges (2007–2011 rankings)
    (pp. 85-86)
  16. APPENDIX B Health and Social Determinants Focus Group Protocols
    (pp. 87-90)
  17. APPENDIX C District of Columbia Hospitals and Community Health Centers
    (pp. 91-92)
  18. References
    (pp. 93-94)