Evaluation of the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Associated Toolkit

Evaluation of the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Associated Toolkit

Jeanne S. Ringel
Christina Y. Huang
Kristy Gonzalez Morganti
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 72
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt5hht47
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  • Book Info
    Evaluation of the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) Guidelines for Foodborne Disease Outbreak Response and Associated Toolkit
    Book Description:

    With reducing the burden of foodborne disease among its primary goals, the multidisciplinary Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) developed the Guidelines for Foodborne Outbreak Response (2009) and a companion Toolkit (2011) to improve foodborne disease outbreak detection and response at the state and local levels. This study assesses the distribution and use of the CIFOR Guidelines and Toolkit to determine whether and to what extent they are reaching their intended users and achieving their goals.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8368-5
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iii)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. iv-v)
  4. Figures
    (pp. vi-vi)
  5. Tables
    (pp. vii-vii)
  6. Summary
    (pp. viii-xii)
  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xiii-xiii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xiv-xiv)
  9. 1. Introduction
    (pp. 1-1)

    Foodborne disease is a significant public health problem. Estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that, in 2011, approximately one in six individuals in the United States was affected by a foodborne disease, resulting in 127,839 hospitalizations and roughly 3,000 deaths (Centers for Disease Control and prevention, 2011; Scallan et al., 2011).

    With reducing the burden of foodborne disease among its primary goals, the multidisciplinary Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR) developed theGuidelines for Foodborne Outbreak Response(Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response, 2009) and a companion Toolkit (Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak...

  10. 2. Methods
    (pp. 2-10)

    We used a mixed-method approach to evaluate the distribution and use of the CIFORGuidelinesand Toolkit. Data were collected through a survey of intended users from public health, environmental health, and food regulatory agencies, as well as public health laboratories, to quantify the reach and use of the CIFORGuidelinesand Toolkit. The survey was conducted among a convenience sample and thus may not be representative of the full population of intended users of the CIFOR resources. However, no list of intended users exists, and the CIFOR member organizations made every effort to distribute the survey link to their...

  11. 3. Results
    (pp. 11-52)

    In this chapter, we present results according to the categories of key research questions shown in Table 2.1. As appropriate, we illustrate general findings with direct quotations that typify observations from survey or interview respondents.

    To achieve the goals of the CIFORGuidelinesand Toolkit, intended users must be aware and make use of these resources. CIFOR attempted to widely distribute and disseminate the CIFORGuidelinesby asking states how many copies they wanted and sending the requested number; it also made the resources available on its website, as well as those of its member organizations. In addition, CIFOR assisted...

  12. 4. Study Limitations
    (pp. 53-54)

    The results presented in this report provide important insights into how widely the CIFORGuidelinesand Toolkit have been disseminated, how they are being used, and how they could be improved. However, the results need to be interpreted within the context of our study methods.

    Several methodological limitations may affect the results. First, our survey was conducted among a convenience sample and thus may not be representative of the full population of intended users of the CIFOR resources. The primary barrier to generating a representative sample is the lack of a well-defined list of intended users from which to draw...

  13. 5. Conclusion
    (pp. 55-55)

    Together, the results from our survey and interviews suggest that the goals for the CIFORGuidelinesand Toolkit are being met. Respondents reported that the resources and corresponding trainings helped them to

    better understand current foodborne disease outbreak response activities in their agency/jurisdiction: In particular, interview respondents noted that working through the Toolkit Focus Areas with all of their partners (i.e., environmental health, epidemiology, and laboratory) helped them to understand the foodborne disease response system as a whole, as well as how their specific activities fit in.

    become more familiar with recommended practices: Many interview respondents noted that theGuidelines,...

  14. Appendix: Brief Description of the CIFOR Guidelines and Toolkit
    (pp. 56-57)
  15. References
    (pp. 58-58)