Maternal Depression

Maternal Depression: Implications for Systems Serving Mother and Child

Lisa Sontag-Padilla
Dana Schultz
Kerry A. Reynolds
Susan L. Lovejoy
Ray Firth
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 9
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt5hhtwv
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  • Book Info
    Maternal Depression
    Book Description:

    Research indicates women are almost twice as likely as men to experience depression, and given that the majority of women age 15 to 50 have children, maternal depression is an important, potentially costly issue. RAND examined evidence on the impact of maternal depression as it relates to the public sector systems that serve mothers and children; specifically, public assistance, physical health, early intervention, education, and child welfare.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-8306-7
    Subjects: Health Sciences, Sociology, Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Maternal Depression: Implications for Systems Serving Mother and Child
    (pp. 1-9)
    Lisa Sontag-Padilla, Dana Schultz, Kerry A. Reynolds, Susan L. Lovejoy and Ray Firth

    Depression affects millions of Americans each year and bears significant societal and financial costs (Kessler, 2012; Wang et al., 2006). However, it is estimated that only 25 percent of individuals with depression receive appropriate care (Young et al., 2001). Given that women are almost twice as likely to experience depression compared to men (Gaynes et al., 2005; Kessler et al., 2003; Kessler et al., 2005) and that the majority of women age 15 to 50 have children (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012), maternal depression is an important and potentially costly issue.

    Each year, more than 400,000 babies are born to women...