Understanding the Public Health Implications of Prisoner Reentry in California

Understanding the Public Health Implications of Prisoner Reentry in California: State-of-the-State Report

Lois M. Davis
Malcolm V. Williams
Kathryn Pitkin Derose
Paul Steinberg
Nancy Nicosia
Adrian Overton
Lisa Miyashiro
Susan Turner
Terry Fain
Eugene Williams
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 250
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mg1165tce
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  • Book Info
    Understanding the Public Health Implications of Prisoner Reentry in California
    Book Description:

    Examines the health care needs of newly released California prisoners; the communities most affected by reentry and the health care safety net of those communities; the critical roles that health care providers, other social services, and family members play in successful reentry; and the effects of reentry on the children and families of incarcerated individuals. Recommends how to improve access for this population in the current fiscal environment.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-5916-1
    Subjects: Health Sciences, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-vi)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-xii)
  4. Figures
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  5. Tables
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xvii-xxxvi)
  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xxxvii-xxxviii)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxxix-xl)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-12)

    In California, much is changing in terms of the current landscape within which the state and counties will be considering options for how to better meet the health care and rehabilitative needs of the reentry population. When we began this project to assess the public health implications of prisoner reentry in California, the country was in the initial stages of what has now become the most significant national recession since the Great Depression. When we completed our initial set of analyses on the capacity of the health care safety net in 2009, we were already witnessing the impact of the...

  10. CHAPTER TWO What Do We Know About Prisoners’ Health Care Needs and the Capacity of the Safety Net to Meet the Needs of the Reentry Population?
    (pp. 13-48)

    As noted in Chapter One, over the past 20 years, the number of individuals released from California prisons has increased nearly threefold, and most of the state’s prisoners ultimately will return to California communities, bringing with them a variety of health and social needs that must be addressed. This raises key public health challenges, especially because ex-prisoners are returning to communities whose safety nets have already been severely strained. To address these challenges, policymakers need to better understand the health care needs of those returning from prison to communities and the capacity of the health care safety net in those...

  11. CHAPTER THREE Understanding the Challenges of Reentry: Ex-Prisoner Focus Group Results
    (pp. 49-84)

    To understand the health care needs of those released from California state prisons, their experiences in seeking care, and the role health plays in their efforts to reintegrate back into the community and reunite with their families, it is important to hear directly from those who have been incarcerated about their experiences in returning back to local communities. We also wanted to understand, from ex-prisoners’ perspective, what factors facilitated or hindered their ability to meet their health care needs and other needs, their perceptions about access to care and quality of care, and their suggestions about how California can improve...

  12. CHAPTER FOUR Understanding the Challenges of Dealing with Released Prisoners: Provider Interview Results
    (pp. 85-116)

    In Chapter Three, we provided the results from focus groups we conducted with ex-prisoners in three large California counties. The focus group discussions enabled us to hear directly from those who have experienced incarceration about how health influences the reentry process, factors that facilitated or hindered their ability to meet their health care and other needs, their perceptions about access to care and quality of care, and their suggestions about how California can improve its provision of services to the reentry population.

    In this chapter, we summarize key findings from the literature about ex-prisoners’ access to insurance, how the safety...

  13. CHAPTER FIVE The Impact of Incarceration on Families: Key Findings
    (pp. 117-142)

    As of 2000, an estimated 856,000 California children—approximately 1 in 9—have a parent involved in the adult criminal justice system (Simmons, 2000). Fifty percent of African-American inmates, 60 percent of Latino inmates, and 53 percent of white inmates in state prison have children under the age of 18 years (Davis et al., 2009). Approximately 21 percent of California prisoners (or 41 percent of those who reported minor children at the time of the BJS Survey of Inmates interview) were living with their children at the time of their latest arrest.

    These children often face a set of odds...

  14. CHAPTER SIX Conclusions and Recommendations
    (pp. 143-172)

    Our report explores the public health implications of prisoner reentry in California and the challenges that reentry creates for individuals returning from prison, for their families, and for their communities. In this chapter, we provide recommendations for how to address these challenges, while considering the overall policy and economic contexts. We argue that the economic crisis, reductions in prison rehabilitative services, the increased numbers of individuals who will be housed and supervised at the county level, and a weakened safety net in the communities receiving these individuals all pose serious challenges to addressing the health needs of the reentry population,...

  15. APPENDIX A Methodology
    (pp. 173-180)
  16. APPENDIX B Protocols
    (pp. 181-196)
  17. References
    (pp. 197-210)