The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States

The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States

LYNN A. KAROLY
CONSTANTIJN W. A. PANIS
Copyright Date: 2004
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 304
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mg164dol
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  • Book Info
    The 21st Century at Work: Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States
    Book Description:

    What are the forces that will continue to shape the U.S. workforce and workplace over the next 10 to 15 years? With its eye on forming sound policy and helping stakeholders in the private and public sectors make informed decisions, the U.S. Department of Labor asked RAND to look at the future of work. The authors analyze trends in and the implications of shifting demographic patterns, the pace of technological change, and the path of economic globalization.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3618-6
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. FIGURES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. TABLES
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. BOXES
    (pp. xi-xii)
  7. SUMMARY
    (pp. xiii-xl)
  8. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xli-xlii)
  9. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xliii-xlvi)
  10. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-14)

    In the next 10 to 15 years, work in the United States will be shaped by a number of forces, including demographic trends, advances in technology, and the process of economic globalization. In many respects, these key factors have already played a role in shaping the world of work in today’s economy. They have influenced the size and composition of the labor force, the features of the workplace, and the compensation structures provided by employers. How these factors continue to evolve will further influence the workforce and the workplace, often in ways that can be predicted. In some cases, however,...

  11. Chapter Two SHIFTING DEMOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS SHAPING THE FUTURE WORKFORCE
    (pp. 15-78)

    In the next 10 to 15 years, important demographic shifts will continue to influence the size and composition of the workforce. The size and composition of the population, as well as labor force participation rates, determine the number and makeup of people who want to work. Demographic parameters also influence the consumption patterns of the population and thus the mix of goods and services produced and the labor required to produce them. These factors continue to evolve, in some ways that perpetuate recent trends, and in other ways that suggest changes from the recent past.

    In this chapter, we elaborate...

  12. Chapter Three THE INFORMATION AGE AND BEYOND: THE REACH OF TECHNOLOGY
    (pp. 79-126)

    By the end of the twentieth century, the U.S. economy was shifting from one based on production to one based on information. New technologies had spawned new products and industries and had transformed the way firms in established industries were organized and labor was employed. In the coming decades, technological advances promise to further shape what is produced; how capital, material, and labor inputs are combined to produce it; how work is organized and where it is conducted; and even who is available to work.

    To anticipate the future consequences of technology for the workforce and workplace, we begin this...

  13. Chapter Four A NEW ERA OF GLOBAL INTEGRATION
    (pp. 127-182)

    It is now commonplace to hear the world today described as being increasingly integrated, interconnected, or interdependent. Whether the metric is the extent of cross-national trade in goods and services, the mobility of investment capital across borders, the flow of human migrants from one country to another, or the number of Internet users across the globe, many see the economies and peoples of the world tied together even more so than in the past. The outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in late 2002 demonstrates the extent to which even the germs that infect humans can jump from continent...

  14. Chapter Five IMPLICATIONS FOR WORK IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
    (pp. 183-222)

    In the preceding chapters, we have examined three forces that will influence the world of work in the twenty-first century. Thedemographictrends point to a workforce that will not grow as rapidly as in the past but will continue to evolve in terms of its composition by gender, age, race and ethnicity, language, and family responsibilities. The labor force may grow more rapidly if some population groups increase their participation in the labor market, and skill will be the defining characteristic of future workers. At the same time, ongoingtechnological progressin information technologies, biotechnology, and nanotechnology will continue...

  15. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 223-258)