The Origins and Evolution of Family Planning Programs in Developing Countries

The Origins and Evolution of Family Planning Programs in Developing Countries

Judith R. Seltzer
Copyright Date: 2002
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 208
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1276wfhf-dlpf-rf
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  • Book Info
    The Origins and Evolution of Family Planning Programs in Developing Countries
    Book Description:

    This book analyzes the origins and rationale of family planning programs and how they have evolved based on experience in different country settings.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3374-1
    Subjects: Population Studies, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. TABLES
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. xi-xx)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xxi-xxii)
  7. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  8. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-8)

    Family planning programs—organized efforts to provide contraception to women and men—were one of the major social and health interventions in the second half of the 20th century. These programs exist in most countries and in all world regions. As of 1998, 179 governments, representing 92 percent of governments where over 99 percent of the world’s population lived, supported access to contraception.¹ Governments provide substantial support for family planning, and most users of contraception in developing countries rely on their governments for contraceptive supplies and services, although the private sector, including pharmacies and private organizations, is also an important...

  9. Chapter Two ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION OF FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAMS
    (pp. 9-44)

    This chapter presents the reasons that family planning programs received growing support internationally beginning in the 1960s; how interest on the part of developing countries governments grew; some of the key characteristics of family planning programs and how these evolved over time; and finally, how family planning programs have been funded—including the level of support from international donors and funding organizations. It provides an historical overview of family planning programs so that the controversies, criticisms, and research related to the rationale for programs, which follow in Chapters Three through Five, can be better understood.

    Three U.S. organizations, the Ford...

  10. Chapter Three DEMOGRAPHIC RATIONALE
    (pp. 45-72)

    This chapter deals with three aspects of the demographic rationale for family planning programs. First is the relationship between population growth and economic development. A related issue is the current concern about future population growth and whether declining fertility rates will lead to a birth dearth in more and more nations. Second is the role of family planning programs as a public policy for addressing high fertility and population growth. Third is the critique of the demographic rationale based on concerns over human rights and particularly the conflict between societal and individual goals and rights.

    The “demographic rationale” for family...

  11. Chapter Four HEALTH RATIONALE
    (pp. 73-108)

    This chapter discusses several aspects of the health rationale for family planning programs. First is the role of contraceptive technology and concerns about contraceptive safety. Second is the health benefits of regulating fertility. Third is the relationship between abortion and family planning. Fourth is the concern over the quality of care in family planning programs. The final aspect is the broader context of reproductive health for family planning services.

    The appropriate role of contraceptive technology has been a key element of the controversy over family planning programs.¹ Critics of family planning programs and contraceptive technology questioned whether they would be...

  12. Chapter Five OTHER HUMAN RIGHTS CONCERNS
    (pp. 109-132)

    This chapter reviews two issues in the development of family planning programs that are related to human rights. The preceding discussions of the demographic rationale and the broader context of reproductive health for family planning noted the significance of human rights considerations. The controversies, criticisms, and research presented in this chapter deal with other issues related to human rights—those based on fears of cultural intrusion stemming from the activities of the international population movement and religious concerns and influences that are an important component of culture in many settings.

    The issue of cultural intrusion has appeared from time to...

  13. Chapter Six CONCLUSIONS, LESSONS LEARNED, AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS
    (pp. 133-142)

    Thirty-five years after the beginning of the international movement for family planning in developing countries, the majority of developing countries have policies to lower population growth and reduce fertility. The vast majority of developing countries support access to family planning services through organized programs that provide contraception to women and men. This support, coupled with that from international donor and funding organizations, has been substantial and has contributed to the increased availability of family planning services. Over half of the world’s couples in developing countries uses contraception, and in many countries the level of contraceptive prevalence is over 70 percent....

  14. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 143-174)
  15. INDEX
    (pp. 175-186)