Greece's New Geopolitics

Greece's New Geopolitics

Ian O. Lesser
F. Stephen Larrabee
Michele Zanini
Katia Vlachos-Dengler
Copyright Date: 2001
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 137
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1393kf
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  • Book Info
    Greece's New Geopolitics
    Book Description:

    Greece has been profoundly affected by recent changes in the internationalenvironment, on its borders, and within the country itself. Manylong-standing assumptions about Greek interests and Greece_s role havefallen away and have been supplanted by new approaches. The country hasbecome progressively more modern and more European, and its internationalpolicy has become more sophisticated. At the same time, the geopoliticalscene has evolved in ways that present new challenges and new opportunitiesfor Athens in its relations with Europe, the United States, and neighboringcountries. Many of these challenges cross traditional regional boundariesand underscore Greece_s potential to play a transregional role, lookingoutward from Europe to the Mediterranean, Eurasia, and the Middle East. Thisreport explores the new geopolitical environment Greece faces, payingspecial attention to the implications for southeastern Europe andtransatlantic relations; explores options for Greek strategy; and offerssome new directions for policy in Greece and on both sides of the Atlantic.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3233-1
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. FIGURES AND TABLE
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. xi-xvi)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  7. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xix-xx)
  8. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-6)

    Greece has entered the 21st century with an increasingly modern and prosperous society, a more moderate political scene, and a more complex and cooperative set of international relationships. In nearly every respect, the country is more deeply integrated in Europe and closer to the European mainstream than many observers could have imagined a decade ago. In this respect, Greece has followed a pattern evident across southern Europe since the end of the Cold War. It is also a pattern that has largely eluded Greece’s own neighbors in southeastern Europe and across the Aegean—although here, too, there are now important...

  9. Chapter Two GREECE’S NEW STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENT
    (pp. 7-38)

    At the start of the 21st century, Greece’s foreign and security policy horizons have expanded, and the country is more firmly in the European mainstream than ever before. Greece is actively engaged in the stabilization and reconstruction of southeastern Europe, relations with Turkey are much improved, and the bilateral relationship with the United States has been normalized in key respects. The continued evolution of Greek society and the country’s foreign policy debate will exert a strong influence on Greece’s international policies and potential in the coming years.¹ At the same time, the regions surrounding Greece, as well as the international...

  10. Chapter Three BALKAN SECURITY AFTER THE FALL OF MILOSEVIC: CHALLENGES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GREECE
    (pp. 39-72)

    The Balkans have traditionally been characterized by political instability and turmoil. In the 19th century, the region was the object of Great Power rivalry and resurgent nationalism, as Britain, Russia and Austria-Hungary sought to exploit the political vacuum caused by the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire to expand their influence in the region. This rivalry exacerbated local tensions and directly contributed to the outbreak of World War I.

    In the post–Cold War period, the Balkans have again emerged as a source of instability and concern. The disintegration of Yugoslavia and the collapse of communism in southeastern Europe have led...

  11. Chapter Four THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT IN AND AROUND SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE
    (pp. 73-102)

    As Vojislav Kostunica began his term as president of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, the attention of policymakers quickly focused on the challenge of rebuilding the country’s crippled infrastructure, which suffered throughout the 1990s as a result of neglect, sanctions, and NATO’s air campaign.

    The Yugoslav Republic is only the latest, if arguably the most critical, target of international efforts at rebuilding and upgrading the infrastructure of southeastern Europe. In fact, since the end of the Kosovo conflict, countries in and around the region have, under the umbrella of the Stability Pact, devised plans and allocated funds for significant transportation...

  12. Chapter Five CONCLUSIONS AND POLICY DIRECTIONS
    (pp. 103-112)

    The last few years have witnessed a transformation in Greek foreign policy. This transformation has been a response to developments in the international environment, around Greece and further afield. It also reflects changes within Greek society and in the economic and political imperatives of a more European policy. Overall, the demands on Greek policymakers, and those outside the formal policy process who would wish to understand and help shape the debate, have increased substantially. The country’s foreign concerns and objectives—never simple—have been further complicated by the need to shape policy, to a greater extent than ever before, in...

  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 113-124)