Intelligent Giving

Intelligent Giving: Insights and Strategies for Higher Education Donors

Jonathan P. Caulkins
Jay Cole
Melissa Hardoby
Donna Keyser
Copyright Date: 2002
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 104
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1427cae
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  • Book Info
    Intelligent Giving
    Book Description:

    Provides an intellectual framework for guiding prospective major donors in giving more effectively to higher education.Although most major gifts are profoundly motivated by charitable intentions, the noble impulse to give to higher education can quickly generate complicated choices. Which school? Which program? Under what terms or conditions? Even very talented people who have enjoyed exceptionally successful careers in business and other fields can become disoriented by academe_s idiosyncrasies. This book provides an intellectual framework for guiding prospective major donors in giving more effectively to higher education. It supplies some insight into the higher education sector, donor opportunities, the development process, and how to think about and get the most from a _negotiation_ with the institution of the donor_s choice. The insights and strategies are culled by a RAND research team mainly from interviews with development officers, institutional leaders, and donors themselves. Ultimately the giving process that works best for any donor will depend on his or her individual interests and needs. The best advice is to be clear on what effect the donor wants his or her gift to have, to seek as much information on the school/situation as possible, and to consult with an attorney and a good financial advisor at all stages of the giving process.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3383-3
    Subjects: Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Executive Summary
    (pp. vii-xii)
  5. 1 Introduction
    (pp. 1-8)

    The U.S. higher education sector is hands down best in the world. Over 350 years after the great American experiment with higher education began, our country is now home to some 4,000 institutions of higher education, both public and private nonprofit, and at least that many private proprietary institutions of postsecondary education and training. Among these are included between two-thirds and three-fourths of the best universities in the world (Rosovsky, 1990).

    American higher education is responsible for hundreds of billions of dollars in economic activity each year, generates thousands of industrial and scientific patents, and publishes entire libraries of scholarly...

  6. 2 Understanding the U.S. Higher Education System
    (pp. 9-36)

    The U.S. higher education system is large, diverse, and complex. There are many different types of institutions, both public and private (see Figure 2.1). Sizes range from the Community College of the Air Force with over 60,000 students and the University of Texas at Austin, with 49,000 students, to Deep Springs College with an enrollment of 26 on a cattle and alfalfa farm in the remote desert of eastern California. The largest schools are primarily public institutions (see Table 2.1), which have two orders of magnitude more students than do smaller liberal arts schools. Even among institutions of the same...

  7. 3 Fundraising Inside the Ivory Tower
    (pp. 37-48)

    Over time, higher education fundraising has evolved into a high-tech, multimillion dollar business with highly trained professional staff and wide-ranging strategies. Different institutions use different terms, but commonly “advancement” refers to all activities that build awareness and support from constituents, including alumni relations, public relations, and government relations. “Development” generally focuses more narrowly on acquiring financial support for the institution’s programs. From the institution’s perspective, none of this is wasteful or burdensome overhead. A clear and consistent association is found between dollars spent on fundraising and the results of fundraising. Simply put, you have to spend money to raise money....

  8. 4 The What, How, and When of Giving
    (pp. 49-66)

    One of the basic choices donors to higher education face is what specifically to fund. This question can be difficult to answer not because it is hard to find something to fund, but rather because there are so many interesting opportunities. Indeed, it can be more difficult to think of things one cannot fund than things one can. Likewise, in terms of how and when to give funds, anything is possible. We offer below an organized sampling of the possibilities you might want to consider.

    The three most common funding opportunities in higher education are (1) buildings or portions of...

  9. 5 Selected Giving Strategies
    (pp. 67-76)

    In some sense, the most important questions donors need to address are not “who to give to?” (this school or that) or “how to give?” (that’s an issue for financial planners), but rather “why?” What is most important to you and your family? What responsibilities do you feel to society? Does your family have a strong culture as it relates to philanthropy? If not, do you want to create one? To a certain extent, therefore, philanthropy will always remain a very personal exercise, based on inward soul searching, personal passion, and your capacity and inclination to realize your dreams.

    On...

  10. 6 Conclusion
    (pp. 77-78)

    Our goal in writing this book was to guide prospective major donors in giving more effectively to higher education. Although most major gifts are profoundly motivated by charitable intentions, the noble impulse to give to higher education can quickly generate complicated choices. Which school? Which program? Under what terms or conditions? Even very talented people who have enjoyed exceptionally successful careers in business and other fields can become disoriented by academe’s idiosyncrasies. We hope that this book has provided some insight into the higher education sector, giving opportunities, the development process, and how to think about and get the most...

  11. APPENDIX A Additional Resources for Donors
    (pp. 79-84)
  12. APPENDIX B Interview Protocol
    (pp. 85-86)
  13. Bibliography
    (pp. 87-92)