You've Got Dissent! Chinese Dissident Use of the Internet and Beijing's Counter-Strategies

You've Got Dissent! Chinese Dissident Use of the Internet and Beijing's Counter-Strategies

Michael Chase
James Mulvenon
Copyright Date: 2002
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 132
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1543
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  • Book Info
    You've Got Dissent! Chinese Dissident Use of the Internet and Beijing's Counter-Strategies
    Book Description:

    An analysis of the political use of the Internet by Chinese dissidents, both in the PRC and abroad, and the counterstrategies that Beijing has employed to prevent or minimize its impact. Although PRC officials have responded to the increased use of the Internet with predominantly traditional measures, they have been relatively successful. No credible challenges to the regime exist at present, despite the introduction of a massive modern telecommunications infrastructure. However, time may be on the side of the regime's opponents.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3394-9
    Subjects: Technology, Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. FIGURES AND TABLES
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  7. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Chapter One POLITICAL USE OF THE INTERNET IN CHINA
    (pp. 1-44)

    This report addresses the use of the Internet by Chinese dissidents, members of Falungong,¹ Tibetan activists, and other groups and individuals in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and abroad who are regarded as subversive by the Chinese authorities. It also examines the counterstrategies that those authorities have employed in their efforts to prevent or minimize the impact of dissident use of the Internet. Finally it attempts to assess future trends in these areas.

    The report is based on interviews with numerous government officials in Washington, D.C., and Beijing, as well as discussions with dissidents, Falungong members, human-rights advocates, and...

  9. Chapter Two GOVERNMENT COUNTERSTRATEGIES
    (pp. 45-92)

    China faces a very modern paradox. The regime seems to believe that the Internet is a key engine of the New Economy, despite the burst of the Internet bubble and the dashed hopes of numerous Chinese “dotcom” companies, and that future economic growth in China will depend in large measure on the extent to which the country is integrated with the global information infrastructure. Economic growth is directly linked to social stability for the Beijing leadership, and absent communism or some other unifying ideology, maintenance of prosperity has become the linchpin of regime legitimacy and survival. Since economic growth has...

  10. Appendix: DISSIDENT WEB SITES
    (pp. 93-102)
  11. REFERENCES
    (pp. 103-116)