Countering al Qaeda

Countering al Qaeda: An Appreciation of the Situation and Suggestions for Strategy

Brian Michael Jenkins
Copyright Date: 2002
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 35
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1620rc
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  • Book Info
    Countering al Qaeda
    Book Description:

    This monograph reviews events since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, and discusses the current state of al Qaeda and the kinds of actions that can be expected of it in the future. Al Qaeda constitutes the most serious immediate threat to the security of the United States, so the campaign against terrorism must remain focused. The monograph describes the central elements that must be emphasized in the next, more-complex phase of that campaign.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3407-6
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. SUMMARY
    (pp. vii-x)
  5. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
  6. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-2)

    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the United States has achieved significant successes in its war on terrorism. Removing the Taliban government in Afghanistan, thereby eliminating al Qaeda’s sanctuary and training camps, has broken an important link in the process that once provided al Qaeda’s leadership with a continuing flow of recruits. Toppling the Taliban also demonstrated American resolve and international support, and it underscored the considerable risk run by governments that provide assistance to terrorists.

    The United States has avoided portraying its campaign against al Qaeda and the Taliban as a crusade against Islam (an accusation made...

  7. Chapter Two UNDERSTANDING THE ENEMY
    (pp. 3-16)

    Al Qaeda was a product of the struggle to eject the Soviet Union from Afghanistan. Portrayed as a holy war, that campaign brought together volunteers and financial contributors from throughout the Islamic world. Muslims from Algeria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Southeast Asia, and beyond fought side by side, forging relationships and creating a cadre of veterans who shared a powerful life experience, a more global view, and a heady sense of confidence underscored by the Soviet Union’s ultimate withdrawal and subsequent collapse, for which they assumed credit. Instead of being welcomed home as heroes, however, the returning veterans of the Afghan...

  8. Chapter Three STRATEGY FOR THE SECOND PHASE OF THE WAR ON TERRORISM
    (pp. 17-30)

    The United States has formulated and carried out a coherent first-phase strategy in the war on terrorism. But what next? The campaign has now entered a more difficult phase. The greatest challenge is that as military operations move beyond a single theater, the more complex tasks will be dispersed among numerous departments, agencies, and offices, and the focus on the overall U.S. strategy will be lost, along with the nation’s ability to coordinate operations. That strategy must continue to emphasize the key elements outlined below.

    The destruction of al Qaeda must remain the primary aim of the American campaign. Al...