Terrorism and Development

Terrorism and Development: Using Social and Economic Development to Inhibit a Resurgence of Terrorism

Kim Cragin
Peter Chalk
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 60
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1630rc
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  • Book Info
    Terrorism and Development
    Book Description:

    This report examines the social and economic development policies enacted by three countries-Israel, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom-to inhibit a resurgence of terrorism within their jurisdictions. Drawing on a broad research base, including numerous first-hand interviews, the authors outline the initiatives implemented by each country then assess their effectiveness, with the aim of informing U.S. decisionmakers of the benefits and pitfalls of such initiatives as they develop policy to counter terrorism.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3408-3
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. TABLES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. ix-xiv)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  7. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Chapter One INTERPRETING THE PROBLEM
    (pp. 1-4)

    This report examines social and economic development policies enacted by three countries—Israel, the Philippines, and the United Kingdom (U.K.)—to inhibit a resurgence of terrorist violence within their territorial jurisdictions.¹ To do this, the study incorporates an evaluation of the types of projects chosen and their implementation to ascertain the benefits and shortcomings of using social and economic development as a counterterrorism tool.

    There has been significant disagreement in academic and policymaking communities as to what exactly constitutes “development” as well as “terrorism.”² This analysis, therefore, begins with a short explanation of development, terrorism, and the interaction between the...

  9. Chapter Two NORTHERN IRELAND
    (pp. 5-14)

    Civil violence has been a feature of Northern Ireland’s political landscape for almost a century.¹ The contemporary conflict has essentially focused on the conflicting ambitions of militant extremists in both Catholic and Protestant communities. The former have waged a bloody campaign to wrest Northern Ireland from British control so that it can be reunited with the Catholic-dominated Republic to the south (hence their designation as “Republicans”). The latter, fearing a loss of status and privilege in what would be a largely non-Protestant polity, have forcefully rejected any change in the constitutional status of the province and fought to ensure that...

  10. Chapter Three MINDANAO
    (pp. 15-22)

    The southern Philippines has suffered from civil unrest and violence for the past three decades, most of which has revolved around the separatist ambitions of the Moro Muslim population in Mindanao. Never fully colonized by either the Spanish or the United States, this traditionally staunch Islamic enclave has long stood apart from the overwhelmingly Catholic orientation of the Philippine state. General alienation and discontent, however, has been exacerbated by several specific factors, including

    economic neglect and the general exploitation of local resources to foster development in the central and northern islands of the Philippines

    the gradual dispossession of ancestral lands...

  11. Chapter Four WEST BANK AND GAZA STRIP
    (pp. 23-32)

    The modern roots of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict lie in the conflicting claims of Jewish and Arab communities to the Holy Land. The original issue in this struggle was the validity and meaning of the League of Nations mandate over Palestine, which was given to Britain and which incorporated an earlier promise by London (the Balfour Declaration) to support the creation of a Jewish “national home” in the area. In 1948 the state of Israel was proclaimed, its existence rationalized in terms of both the League of Nations mandate and a self-determined Jewish belief in their right to the Holy Land....

  12. Chapter Five POLICY IMPLICATIONS
    (pp. 33-36)

    The purpose of this analysis was to explore the ways in which development policies can be used to inhibit a resurgence of terrorist activities and generally discourage local support for political extremism. We arrived at four principal conclusions.

    First, our analysis of the Philippine case suggests that if development assistance is not appropriately funded relative to the size, geography, and needs of targeted regions, it is liable to act as a double-edged sword by precipitating a revolution of rising (and unfulfilled) expectations. This conclusion has direct implications for the U.S. war on terrorism: Recent U.S. pledges of aid to alleviate...

  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 37-42)