An Operational Process for Workforce Planning

An Operational Process for Workforce Planning

Robert M. Emmerichs
Cheryl Y. Marcum
Albert A. Robbert
Copyright Date: 2004
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 78
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1684-1osd
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    An Operational Process for Workforce Planning
    Book Description:

    Workforce planning is an activity intended to ensure that investment in human capital results in the timely capability to effectively carry out an organization's strategic intent. This report examines the purposes of workforce planning, identifies key factors contributing to successful workforce planning, and describes a RAND-developed process for conducting workforce planning.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-4835-6
    Subjects: Transportation Studies, Management & Organizational Behavior, Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. FIGURES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. ix-xiv)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  7. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xvii-xviii)
  8. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-4)

    Workforce planning is neither a new activity nor an ephemeral management craze. Organizations in the private sector have engaged in workforce planning for decades.¹ It is, however, a relatively recent activity throughout most of the federal government, with some notable exceptions such as planning for military forces by the military services in the Department of Defense (DoD). Although a large number of impending retirements stimulated interest in civilian workforce planning in the DoD and many other federal agencies,² some agencies have taken the next step and incorporated workforce planning into their overall planning process.³

    Unfortunately, widespread discussion of workforce planning...

  9. Chapter Two A GOAL-ORIENTED VIEW: THE PURPOSE OF STRATEGIC WORKFORCE PLANNING
    (pp. 5-6)

    The definition of workforce planning affords insight into its purpose. For example, the National Academy of Public Administration (2000, p. 1) defines strategic workforce planning as “a systematic process for identifying the human capital required to meet organizational goals and for developing the strategies to meet these requirements.” Ripley (2000, p. 1) suggests that workforce planning is “a systematic assessment of workforce content and composition issues and [determination of] what actions must be taken to respond to future needs.”

    Building on these and similar definitions, we concluded that organizations employ workforce planning to accomplish at least three purposes:

    to obtain...

  10. Chapter Three A STRUCTURAL VIEW: THEMES AND A BLUEPRINT FOR WORKFORCE PLANNING
    (pp. 7-28)

    This chapter presents the structural view of workforce planning. It describes a comprehensive conceptual foundation upon which an organization can build when engaging in the workforce planning process at the business unit or business line level. To establish this foundation, we first pose four thematic questions any operational workforce planning process must answer. We then use these questions to construct a workforce planning blueprint that describes the essential components of workforce planning. To convert the workforce planning blueprint into reality, however, an organization needs a process for engaging its key participants. Chapter Four describes that organizational process.

    Planning sets out...

  11. Chapter Four A PROCESS VIEW: FOUR STEPS TO WORKFORCE PLANNING
    (pp. 29-44)

    The blueprint described in Chapter Three provides the foundation—the information needed—to answer the four thematic questions underlying workforce planning. This chapter describes a four-step process any organization can use to engage its key participants in gathering and employing that information to accomplish the three purposes of workforce planning set forth in Chapter Two. We begin by defining the intent of the process. We then describe the four steps. We conclude with observations on the key features of the process—related to the critical role of executive and line judgments, an incremental approach for using existing data to estimate...

  12. Chapter Five KEY SUCCESS FACTORS IN WORKFORCE PLANNING
    (pp. 45-48)

    As described in Chapter Three, three key factors lead to successful workforce planning: active executive and line participation, accurate and relevant data, and sophisticated workload and inventory projection models. In this chapter, we set out our major recommendations relevant to these factors to enhance the effectiveness of the workforce planning activity. We end with a concluding summary.

    The line of sight between how leaders want to carry out business in the future and the human capital capabilities needed to do that effectively is clearest at the business unit level (or below). Even so, characterizing the capabilities needed is not an...

  13. Appendix A. THE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE PROJECTION MODEL
    (pp. 49-54)
  14. Appendix B. SAMPLE AGENDA FOR CONDUCTING THE WORKFORCE PLANNING PROCESS
    (pp. 55-58)
  15. REFERENCES
    (pp. 59-60)