The Information Revolution in Asia

The Information Revolution in Asia

Nina Hachigian
Lily Wu
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 130
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1719nic
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  • Book Info
    The Information Revolution in Asia
    Book Description:

    This report discusses the information revolution in the Asia-Pacific region and its likely course over the next five to ten years. Key questions addressed in this report include the extent to which the information revolution has taken hold of markets in this region, the political implications of the information revolution for Asian governments, the variations between individual countries, and the prospects for further information-technology-related developments in the region.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3606-3
    Subjects: Technology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. FIGURES
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. TABLES
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. SUMMARY
    (pp. xi-xxii)
  7. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xxiii-xxiv)
  8. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xxv-xxviii)
  9. Chapter One CURRENT STATUS OF THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION IN ASIA
    (pp. 1-54)
    Lily Wu

    This chapter surveys the drivers that shape the current and future information technology (IT) landscape in Asia. IT’s current status will be viewed from two major perspectives:

    Use and adoption of advanced information technology, and

    Production and creation of information technology.

    To understand the factors driving and shaping the future of both IT use and production trends, we examine the history and development of models that exist today and key environmental factors, such as government policies and funding.

    Asia includes both the world’s most advanced IT users and producers and also some of the least advanced (see Tables 1.1, 1.2,...

  10. Chapter Two POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THE INFORMATION REVOLUTION IN ASIA
    (pp. 55-92)
    Nina Hachigian

    This chapter addresses two interrelated questions—how has IT changed political dynamics within the countries of the Asia-Pacific region? And how are governments using IT to govern? To answer the first, which requires investigation of political dynamics, we look largely at the “bottom-up” actions and initiatives of citizens, civil society, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and political parties, from organizing protests of government policies to overthrowing sitting regimes. In answering the second question, we will examine “top-down” initiatives of governments that use technology to deliver information and services, generally termed electronic government or e-government. The division between these two topics is not...

  11. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 93-102)