NATO's Eastern Agenda in a New Strategic Era

NATO's Eastern Agenda in a New Strategic Era

F. Stephen Larrabee
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 214
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1744af
  • Cite this Item
  • Book Info
    NATO's Eastern Agenda in a New Strategic Era
    Book Description:

    NATO's Eastern agenda faces several challenges, including consolidating the democratic transitions in Central and Eastern Europe, ensuring the security of the Baltic states, developing a post-NATO-enlargement strategy for Ukraine, deepening the Russia-NATO partnership, and engaging the Caucasus and Central Asia. The author also considers NATO's broader transformation.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3610-0
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. FIGURES
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. xi-xx)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xxi-xxi)
  7. [Map]
    (pp. xxii-xxii)
  8. Chapter One NATO’S EASTERN AGENDA IN A NEW STRATEGIC ERA
    (pp. 1-10)

    Since the end of the Cold War, NATO has undergone a major process of adaptation and change.¹ One of the key elements of this transformation has been the development of a new “Eastern agenda.” The centerpiece of this new agenda has been NATO’s eastward enlargement. Enlargement was not undertaken in response to any new military threat, but rather was designed to help export stability eastward and to prevent the emergence of a security vacuum in Central and Eastern Europe.

    The enlargement of NATO, as Ronald Asmus has argued, was not preordained or inevitable. It occurred because the United States, as...

  9. Chapter Two CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE
    (pp. 11-50)

    Historically, Central Europe has been a source of political instability and geopolitical rivalry. In the interwar period, a combination of economic backwardness, political weakness, and unresolved minority problems led to the rise of right-wing antidemocratic governments and a search for powerful patrons that significantly contributed to making the region a source of instability and tension.¹

    With the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe in 1989, many in the West feared that Central Europe might again become a source of instability and insecurity. Today, however, this possibility seems increasingly remote. Hungary, Poland, and the Czech Republic are being incorporated into Euro-Atlantic...

  10. Chapter Three BALTIC SECURITY
    (pp. 51-86)

    The Baltic issue has been the most difficult part of the enlargement puzzle. Many Western officials and observers argued that the Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) could not—or should not—be admitted to NATO. They feared that Baltic membership would seriously damage NATO’s relations with Russia. The invitations at Prague and Copenhagen thus represent a significant victory for the Baltic states and the end to a long uphill battle.

    At the same time, they create a new set of security challenges. For much of the last decade, ensuring the security of the Baltic states was an important Western—...

  11. Chapter Four UKRAINE’S UNCERTAIN “EUROPEAN CHOICE”
    (pp. 87-114)

    The emergence of an independent Ukraine is one of the most significant geopolitical developments emerging from the collapse of the former Soviet Union. An independent Ukraine transforms the geopolitics of Europe, especially Central Europe. As Zbigniew Brzezinski has pointed out, without Ukraine Russia ceases to be a European empire. However, if Russia were to regain control over Ukraine, Russia would acquire the potential to become a powerful imperial state again.¹ Poland would then become the “geopolitical pivot” on the eastern frontier of a united Europe. Hence, how Ukraine evolves will have a critical influence on the evolution of the post–...

  12. Chapter Five WHITHER RUSSIA?
    (pp. 115-158)

    The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 dramatically changed the geopolitical map of Eurasia and has had profound consequences for Russia’s role in world affairs. As a result of the USSR’s disintegration, Russia’s frontiers were rolled back in the West to where they were in the 1600s, shortly after the reign of Ivan the Terrible. In the Baltic region, Russia lost the ports of Riga and Tallinn, limiting Russia’s access to the Baltic Sea. The loss of the Baltic states also left gaping holes in Russia’s air defense system.

    Even more important from a geopolitical point of view was...

  13. Chapter Six NATO’S EASTERN AGENDA AFTER PRAGUE: IMPLICATIONS AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. POLICY
    (pp. 159-178)

    The Prague summit in November 2002 marked an important stage in NATO’s transformation following the Cold War. In inviting seven countries to join the Alliance, NATO Heads of State and Government took a major step toward overcoming the division of Europe and creating a “Europe whole and free.” However, the Prague summit does not end NATO’s Eastern agenda. Rather, it creates a new set of challenges—and a new agenda. This new agenda will require continued U.S. attention and enlightened leadership.

    The first challenge in the post-Prague era is to ensure that the consolidation process in Central and Eastern Europe...

  14. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 179-192)