The Counterterror Coalitions

The Counterterror Coalitions: Cooperation with Europe, NATO, and the European Union

Nora Bensahel
Copyright Date: 2003
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 88
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/mr1746af
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  • Book Info
    The Counterterror Coalitions
    Book Description:

    The long-term success of the counterterror campaign will depend on concerted cooperation from European states, but a key question is the extent to which that cooperation should be pursued through European multilateral institutions. This study argues that the United States should pursue military and intelligence cooperation on a bilateral basis, and it should increasingly pursue financial and law enforcement cooperation on a multilateral basis. The United States should adopt a nuanced strategy in its counterterror relations with Europe.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-3612-4
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. PREFACE
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. TABLE
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. SUMMARY
    (pp. ix-xii)
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  7. ACRONYMS
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  8. Chapter One INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-4)

    The Europeans have been, and are likely to continue to be, the United States’ closest partners in the counterterror campaign. The September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were widely interpreted in Europe as a broader attack on Western values of freedom, tolerance, and openness. Memorial services and candlelight vigils erupted almost spontaneously in many European cities, expressing the sentiment captured in the now-famous French newspaper headline, “We are all Americans.”¹

    Leaders from states throughout western and eastern Europe immediately expressed their support for the United States after the attacks and pledged to cooperate...

  9. Chapter Two SEPTEMBER 11 AND THE WAR ON TERRORISM
    (pp. 5-22)

    The European countries were extremely supportive of the United States after September 11. They pledged to support the United States individually, in personal conversations with President Bush and senior U.S. policymakers, and collectively, through NATO and the European Union. NATO’s invocation of its self-defense clause led many to expect that NATO would be an integral part of the military response in Afghanistan, in that the alliance was built around the principle that an attack on one member would be considered an attack on all. Yet it soon became clear that the United States would conduct military operations in Afghanistan without...

  10. Chapter Three THE EVOLVING ROLE OF EUROPEAN INSTITUTIONS
    (pp. 23-44)

    The long-term success of the counterterror campaign will depend on concerted cooperation from the European states. Their strong economies and democratic protections make them attractive locations for terrorist planning—as already demonstrated on September 11. Individual states will continue to make important contributions in identifying and tracking down suspected terrorists, but the ever-increasing interdependence among the European states will also require concerted multilateral action to prevent terrorists from hiding their activities in the gaps between sovereign authorities.

    Interestingly, the European Union may be a more helpful partner in certain aspects of the long-term campaign against terrorism than NATO. Although terrorism...

  11. Chapter Four IMPLICATIONS FOR THE UNITED STATES
    (pp. 45-54)

    The European political environment comprises a complex set of national and international institutions. Individual countries retain primacy in certain areas while multinational institutions become increasingly powerful in others. As the United States develops a policy of counterterror cooperation with Europe, it must strike the right balance between bilateral and multilateral approaches. The policy choice is notwhetherto pursue a bilateral or multilateral strategy; so many important policies are now being made at the European level that multilateral institutions cannot simply be ignored. Instead, the United States must determinewhich issuesare best addressed through a multilateral approach, and which...

  12. Appendix EUROPEAN AND CANADIAN CONTRIBUTIONS TO OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM, OCTOBER 2001–OCTOBER 2002
    (pp. 55-64)
  13. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 65-72)