Emerging Threats and Security Planning

Emerging Threats and Security Planning: How Should We Decide What Hypothetical Threats to Worry About?

Brian A. Jackson
David R. Frelinger
Copyright Date: 2009
Edition: 1
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 30
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/op256rc
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  • Book Info
    Emerging Threats and Security Planning
    Book Description:

    Concerns about how terrorists might attack in the future are central to the design of security efforts to protect both individual targets and the nation overall. This paper explores an approach for assessing novel or emerging threats and prioritizing which merit specific security attention and which can be addressed as part of existing security efforts.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-4864-6
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Tables
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Summary
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Emerging Threats and Security Planning: How Should We Decide What Hypothetical Threats to Worry About?
    (pp. 1-16)

    In building counterterrorism and homeland security capability, security planners at all levels face a variety of tradeoffs. Past attacks demonstrate that terrorist groups can attack targets many ways, and even among these proven threats, planners must weigh the costs and benefits of different security measures and allocate finite resources among them. For example, planners know that terrorists have staged attacks on commercial aviation with man-portable surface-to-air missiles, but they still must make the difficult decision as to whether the benefits of ways the nation could address this threat are sufficient to justify their cost. To protect both individual targets and...

  7. References
    (pp. 17-20)