A Blueprint for Improving the Promotion and Delivery of Adult Vaccination in the United States

A Blueprint for Improving the Promotion and Delivery of Adult Vaccination in the United States

Katherine M. Harris
Lori Uscher
Soeren Mattke
Arthur L. Kellermann
Copyright Date: 2012
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 54
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/tr1169gsk
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  • Book Info
    A Blueprint for Improving the Promotion and Delivery of Adult Vaccination in the United States
    Book Description:

    Vaccine-preventable disease continues to take a heavy toll on adults despite the widespread availability of effective vaccines. This report identifies where efforts to improve the delivery of adult vaccination have stalled and recommends targeted strategies that are supported by available evidence and build on existing infrastructure.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-5978-9
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  4. Figures
    (pp. vii-viii)
  5. Tables
    (pp. ix-x)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xi-xiv)
  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xv-xvi)
  8. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-4)

    Vaccine-preventable disease (VPD) continues to take a heavy toll on adults despite the widespread availability of effective vaccines. Vaccines are designed to harness the body’s natural ability to fight disease by giving the patient’s immune system an “advance look” at a dangerous pathogen so it can swiftly attack and kill it if it tries to cause disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends 11 different vaccinations for adults to prevent a host of diseases.¹ Three are recommended for all adults and eight are recommended based on age or other risk factors....

  9. CHAPTER TWO Findings
    (pp. 5-20)

    Vaccine-preventable disease takes a heavy toll, despite the widespread availability of effective vaccines. The health and productivity costs of influenza alone are estimated to be as high as $87 billion per year.3 In an average year, 95 percent of the approximately 20,000 to 50,000 Americans who die as a result of VPD are adults, a figure that depends, in part, on the severity of annual influenza outbreaks.4, 22 While there are no comprehensive studies of the value of adult vaccination programs, several of the vaccines recommended for adults have been shown to be cost-effective,23 36 and even cost-saving.25, 37 40...

  10. CHAPTER THREE Recommendations
    (pp. 21-26)

    A unique window of opportunity has opened to tackle the challenge of adult vaccination. To realize this opportunity, vaccination stakeholders need to engage in a collaborative effort aimed at promoting adult vaccination and at integrating it into routine office-based practice. Without such an effort, there is the distinct possibility that adult vaccination will, again, get crowded out by other priorities that are supported by other vocal interests. Our investigation informed by stakeholder input suggested five sets of specific actions that vaccination stakeholders and substantive experts should undertake to facilitate practice change around adult vaccination.

    Recommendation 1: Strengthen evidence surrounding practice...

  11. CHAPTER FOUR Conclusions and Policy Implications
    (pp. 27-28)

    Innovative approaches to improve the delivery of adult vaccination rates are sorely needed. We found strong stakeholder consensus surrounding the need for office-based health care providers to be at the center of any efforts. Advice about vaccination from office-based providers is highly credible because they are able to offer it in the context of an ongoing and trusted relationship. Office-based providers are currently unique in possessing the physical and administrative infrastructure needed to make advice about vaccination immediately actionable. However, for a myriad of reasons, office-based practitioners are not currently living up to their potential in this area. National data...

  12. References
    (pp. 29-38)