Lessons from U.S. Allies in Security Cooperation with Third Countries

Lessons from U.S. Allies in Security Cooperation with Third Countries: The Cases of Australia, France, and the United Kingdom

Jennifer D. P. Moroney
Celeste Ward Gventer
Stephanie Pezard
Laurence Smallman
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: RAND Corporation
Pages: 154
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/tr972af
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  • Book Info
    Lessons from U.S. Allies in Security Cooperation with Third Countries
    Book Description:

    Several key U.S. allies engage in security cooperation, albeit on a smaller scale than the United States. To see what the U.S. Air Force can learn from these efforts, the authors examined how and why three allies--Australia, France, and the United Kingdom--provide security cooperation and highlight three key areas that could benefit from further collaboration: staff talks, exercises, and training followed by exercises.

    eISBN: 978-0-8330-5911-6
    Subjects: History, Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-ii)
  2. Preface
    (pp. iii-iv)
  3. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-viii)
  4. Figures
    (pp. ix-x)
  5. Tables
    (pp. xi-xii)
  6. Summary
    (pp. xiii-xviii)
  7. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xix-xx)
  8. Abbreviations
    (pp. xxi-xxiv)
  9. CHAPTER ONE Introduction
    (pp. 1-8)

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) and its allies have a long history of working with partner countries in the context of security cooperation as a means of building the defense capacity of the countries, maintaining and acquiring access to foreign territories for operational purposes, promoting economic and cultural ties, and strengthening relationships with partner air forces and fostering mutual security-related benefits. USAF conducts a host of activities with partner air forces around the world, including training, equipping, and field exercising, and facilitating other, less tangible activities, such as bilateral staff talks, workshops, conferences, tabletop exercises, and professional military education. Many...

  10. CHAPTER TWO Australia’s Approach to Security Cooperation
    (pp. 9-28)

    Australia is actively engaged in security cooperation activities, both in its own region and around the world. Security cooperation is a key mechanism Australia uses to engage other countries and to leverage its highly trained military force for soft power ends. This chapter provides an overview of how Australia considers and plans its security cooperation programs, as well as a representative sample of its many activities.

    Australian policymakers divide these activities into two broad categories:

    1.defence engagement, which includes staff talks, workshops, conferences, and senior-level visits

    2.defence cooperation, which includes education and training and capacity-building (both in Australia...

  11. CHAPTER THREE France’s Approach to Security Cooperation
    (pp. 29-56)

    France has historically pursued an active policy of security and defence cooperation, focused on its former colonies and, more specifically, on Africa. Defense cooperation programs allow France to maintain strong links with countries in which it still has large numbers of expatriates and strong economic interests. The processes and resources underpinning security cooperation have undergone important changes in France over the past 15 years, even more since the accession of Nicolas Sarkozy to the French presidency in 2007. In an effort to make foreign policy more transparent, the president has undertaken to revise the defense agreements that had been binding...

  12. CHAPTER FOUR The United Kingdom’s Approach to Security Cooperation
    (pp. 57-78)

    The UK is in a period of change. After 13 years of government by the Labour Party, a coalition was formed in May 2010 by the Conservative Party and Liberal Democrat Party.¹ This is the first coalition government since the end of World War II. There is an excitement in UK political circles and the media at the novelty of the coalition arrangement, and some in the UK bureaucracy have commented that this is a new way of doing business.

    Almost immediately after the formation of the coalition government, the UK initiated an SDSR, the UK’s first defense review since...

  13. CHAPTER FIVE Comparing the Case Studies
    (pp. 79-84)

    This report has attempted to highlight the positive aspects of and the challenges to the approaches of three key U.S. allies to working with third countries. This chapter compares these approaches in an effort to inform current USAF thinking on security cooperation. The chapter compares similarities and common challenges of each ally’s approach to security cooperation, specifically in terms of strategic outlook, partner country selection and planning, geographic focus, types of activities conducted, resourcing processes, and assessments and lessons learned.

    Table 5.1 summarizes some of the major aspects of each ally’s approach to security cooperation with third countries, based on...

  14. CHAPTER SIX Conclusions and Recommendations
    (pp. 85-92)

    The premise behind our research was that DoD and specifically USAF officials do not have great insight on the security cooperation activities key allies conduct around the world; how they plan for, resource, and assess these activities; what their overall goals and objectives are; and what allied lessons might be applicable to the United States. Without such knowledge, it is virtually impossible to identify security cooperation partnering opportunities with U.S. allies in a comprehensive way when strategic interests align.

    The research for this report focused on three key U.S. allies—Australia, France, and the UK—each with global interests and...

  15. APPENDIX A Royal Australian Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 93-94)
    Celeste Ward Gventer and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  16. APPENDIX B Brazilian Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 95-96)
    Aidan Kirby Winn and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  17. APPENDIX C Chilean Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 97-98)
    Stephanie Pezard and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  18. APPENDIX D Colombian Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 99-100)
    Aidan Kirby Winn and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  19. APPENDIX E French Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 101-102)
    Stephanie Pezard and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  20. APPENDIX F Indian Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 103-104)
    Jeffrey Engstrom and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  21. APPENDIX G Israeli Air and Space Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 105-106)
    Aidan Kirby Winn and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  22. APPENDIX H Japan Air Self-Defense Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 107-108)
    Rachel Swanger and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  23. APPENDIX I Pakistan Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 109-110)
    Jeffrey Engstrom and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  24. APPENDIX J Republic of Korea Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 111-112)
    Stephanie Pezard and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  25. APPENDIX K Singapore Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 113-114)
    Aidan Kirby Winn and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  26. APPENDIX L South African Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 115-116)
    Stephanie Pezard and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  27. APPENDIX M United Arab Emirates Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 117-118)
    Stephanie Pezard and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  28. APPENDIX N Royal Air Force Activities with Foreign Partners
    (pp. 119-120)
    Laurence Smallman and Jennifer D. P. Moroney
  29. Bibliography
    (pp. 121-130)