Jacques Lacan, Past and Present

Jacques Lacan, Past and Present: A Dialogue

ALAIN BADIOU
ÉLISABETH ROUDINESCO
TRANSLATED BY JASON E. SMITH
Copyright Date: 2014
Pages: 112
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/badi16510
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  • Book Info
    Jacques Lacan, Past and Present
    Book Description:

    In this dialogue, Alain Badiou shares the clearest, most detailed account to date of his profound indebtedness to Lacanian psychoanalysis. He explains in depth the tools Lacan gave him to navigate the extremes of his other two philosophical "masters," Jean-Paul Sartre and Louis Althusser. Élisabeth Roudinesco supplements Badiou's experience with her own perspective on the troubled landscape of the French analytic world since Lacan's death -- critiquing, for example, the link (or lack thereof) between politics and psychoanalysis in Lacan's work. Their exchange reinvigorates how the the work of a pivotal twentieth-century thinker is perceived.

    eISBN: 978-0-231-53535-9
    Subjects: Philosophy, Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. I-IV)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. V-VI)
  3. FOREWORD: “I AM COUNTING ON THE TOURBILLON”
    (pp. VII-XX)

    The short book you hold in your hands brings together two people who share a long friendship and an equally enduring attachment to the thought and legacy of the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan. They share in particular the conviction that Lacan was what the French call, in a hardly translatable term, amaître: at once teacher, master, and great thinker, around whose teaching an array of institutions, students, disciples, enemies, and apostates gather. And yet the two people brought together in this dialogue had very different relationships to Lacan.

    Élisabeth Roudinesco is a historian and psychoanalyst and the daughter of...

  4. PREFACE
    (pp. XXI-XXVI)
  5. ONE ONE MASTER, TWO ENCOUNTERS
    (pp. 1-30)

    PHILOSOPHIE MAGAZINE: To start off, can both of you explain your relation to Lacan? What were the circumstances in which you encountered his thought?¹

    ÉLISABETH ROUDINESCO: For me, the adventure of psychoanalysis began at home. My mother, Jenny Aubry, was a hospital doctor and worked with abandoned and neglected children. She was also a psychoanalyst, and was known for having introduced into France the clinical principles of John Bowlby and Anna Freud, which she encountered in London.

    Beginning in 1953 she became not so much a disciple as a fellow traveler of Lacan, and she was by his side at...

  6. TWO THINKING DISORDER
    (pp. 31-68)

    CHRISTINE GOÉMÉ: Thirty years after his death, Lacan has never been so alive. All over the world his thought and the language that carries it make possible advances that are not always limited to the domain of psychoanalytic practice. He forged operatory concepts that make possible an analysis of the crisis and of the discontents currently rocking Western civilization. Before addressing this aspect of Lacan’s modernity, can each of you, Élisabeth Roudinesco and Alain Badiou, paint for us a personal portrait of Lacan?¹

    ALAIN BADIOU: To evoke the figure of Lacan is not only to draw the portrait of a...

  7. NOTES
    (pp. 69-72)
  8. INDEX
    (pp. 73-82)