Deleuze Beyond Badiou

Deleuze Beyond Badiou: Ontology, Multiplicity, and Event

CLAYTON CROCKETT
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/croc16268
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  • Book Info
    Deleuze Beyond Badiou
    Book Description:

    First published in 1997, Alain Badiou's Deleuze: The Clamor of Being cast Gilles Deleuze as a secret philosopher of the One. In this work, Clayton Crockett rehabilitates Deleuze's position within contemporary political and philosophical thought, advancing an original reading of the thinker's major works and a constructive conception of his philosophical ontology. Through close readings of Deleuze's Difference and Repetition, Capitalism and Schizophrenia (with Felix Guattari), and Cinema 2, Crockett argues that Deleuze is anything but the austere, quietistic, and aristocratic intellectual Badiou had portrayed. Instead, Crockett underscores Deleuze's radical aesthetics and innovative scientific, political, and mathematical forms of thought. He also refutes the notion Deleuze retreated from politics toward the end of his life. Using Badiou's critique as a foil, Crockett maintains the profound continuity of Deleuze's work and builds a general interpretation of his more obscure formulations.

    eISBN: 978-0-231-53091-0
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  4. PART I. SETTING UP THE ENCOUNTER
    • ONE INTRODUCTION
      (pp. 3-10)

      What is philosophy? Let’s imagine that a certain kind of philosophical thinking, one that in English-speaking contexts goes by the name “Continental,” passes from Germany to France after World War II. After Husserl and Heidegger, with an assist from Bergson and Sartre, philosophy switches territories and gears and becomes structuralism, whose main purpose (again from the standpoint of English readers of French philosophy) is to become poststructuralism. Poststructuralism has integrity as a (French) philosophical movement, although it immediately bifurcates into deconstruction, which attaches to the proper name of Jacques Derrida, and postmodernism, which is invented by Jean-François Lyotard but is...

    • TWO THE CLAMOR OF BEING: BADIOU VS. DELEUZE
      (pp. 11-26)

      Deleuze: The Clamor of being is one of the strongest readings of Deleuze that exists, and Badiou does an incredible job of synthesizing and presenting an image of Deleuze’s philosophy so that we can consider it at a more profound level. Badiou is committed to, and equal to the challenge of, bestowing a Cartesian clarity upon everything that he engages, which includes nearly every sphere of human thought and activity. Before engaging this critique, I want to say that I am ambivalent about polemics: on the one hand I appreciate and admire Badiou’s incredible ability to polemicize, especially on matters...

  5. PART II. DELEUZE
    • THREE A REPETITION OF DIFFERENCE
      (pp. 29-56)

      In Difference and repetition and The Logic of Sense, Deleuze’s original philosophical works from the late 1960s, the language of univocity and the univocity of Being are more heuristic than metaphysical in the Platonic sense. Univocity provides a way to bring together philosophy and ontology and to express the irreducible multiplicity of Being itself. In his reading of Deleuze in Deleuze: The Clamor of Being, Badiou puts too much emphasis on chapter 1 of Difference and Repetition, as well as the conclusion of the book. Chapter 2 is explosive and revolutionary, and so is chapter 5, and these two chapters...

    • FOUR DELEUZE’S LOGIC OF DOUBLE ARTICULATION
      (pp. 57-74)

      The Logic of sense, originally published in 1969, is the follow-up to Difference and Repetition, and these two works constitute the core of Deleuze’s original philosophy. In thirty-four series of reflections plus five appendices, Deleuze reflects intensively on the logic of sense and language. In some respects, Difference and Repetition can be read as more ontological, whereas The Logic of Sense is more epistemological. Deleuze was also influenced by both structuralism and Lacanian psychoanalysis when he wrote The Logic of Sense; and Anti-Oedipus, written with Guattari, represents a break with both Lacan and structuralism. I will suggest, however, that there...

    • FIVE PRODUCING THE EVENT AS MACHINE, AS FOLD, AND AS IMAGE
      (pp. 75-100)

      The idea of the event has dominated Continental philosophy in the second half of the twentieth century, and the event is crucial for both Deleuze and Badiou. Philosophically, the notion of the event comes from Heidegger and his understanding of the Ereignis of Being. The Ereignis has been variously translated as “event of appropriation” and “en-owning,” but it can also be translation simply as “event.” In his Beiträge, or Contributions to Philosophy, Heidegger sketches out the conditions and possibilities of a new destining of Being, a new manifestation that would succeed the original manifestation of Being in early Greek philosophy....

  6. PART III. BADIOU
    • SIX BEING A SUBLIME EVENT
      (pp. 103-120)

      According to the theoretical physicist Lee Smolin, our human world is “incredibly big, slow and cold compared with the fundamental world” of particle physics as indicated by the Planck scale.¹ Alain Badiou’s mathematical ontology is most fully developed in his book Being and Event, which represents a significant new philosophical understanding of the world. But perhaps his thought here is ultimately too “big, slow and cold” because of his overemphasis on a static and axiomatic form of mathematics. In this chapter, I read Badiou’s mathematical ontology as an elaboration of the Kantian sublime, in which Badiou rigorously separates the mathematical...

    • SEVEN BEING A SUBJECT IN A TRANSCENDENTAL WORLD
      (pp. 121-142)

      In this chapter, I step back from the dizzying heights of Being and Event to consider how Badiou composes the subject in his extraordinary work that precedes Being and Event, Theory of the Subject. Theory of the Subject shows how Badiou constructs his understanding of a dynamic subjectivity, which is largely obscured by the notion of event in Being and Event. From Theory of the Subject, I want to largely bypass Being and Event in order to suture the subject of Theory of the Subject to the vision of transcendental logic and particularly Badiou’s understanding of an object in Logics...

  7. PART IV. DELEUZE BEYOND BADIOU
    • EIGHT ENERGETICS OF BEING
      (pp. 145-164)

      Being is energy transformation. In Difference and Repetition, Deleuze does not explicitly use the language and theories of physics to the extent that he draws on mathematics and biology, but his ideas are nevertheless extremely relevant for contemporary physics. In this chapter, I will discuss Deleuze’s ontology and suggest that it is based on energy transformation rather than atomic reductionism or mathematical set theory. Badiou conceives one form of mathematical multiplicity in Being and Event, and in Logics of Worlds he shows how this mathematical multiplicity underlies an atomistic materialism. For Deleuze, however, materialism is neither reductionistic nor atomistic, and...

    • NINE POLITICS OF THE EVENT
      (pp. 165-184)

      In this penultimate chapter, I reflect from the standpoint of Deleuze on a politics of the event. What is politics? For Badiou, as we have seen, politics is necessarily a major and molar affair that creates revolutionary subjects. Badiou claims that, for all its violence, the twentieth century was marked by an extraordinary “passion for the real.”¹ Even though most of the communist revolutionary projects have ended in failure, Badiou remains faithful to them as events and to the possibility, however remote, of a future political event. A political truth requires the commitment to the communist idea, or at least...

    • TEN VODOU ECONOMICS: HAITI AND THE FUTURE OF DEMOCRACY
      (pp. 185-194)

      By way of a conclusion, and as an opportunity to flesh out further my understanding of the significance of Deleuze’s politics of the event as sketched out in the previous chapter, I engage here in a limited way with Haiti and with Vodou as a sort of test case of a consideration of democracy. Haiti throughout its history and even more visibly since the earthquake in 2010 supplies a set of extreme and brutal conditions for thinking seriously about a desperate people who are missing, as well as a way to think about politics today in a postsecularist, postliberal context.¹...

  8. NOTES
    (pp. 195-210)
  9. INDEX
    (pp. 211-218)
  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 219-220)