Jerusalem Unbound

Jerusalem Unbound: Geography, History, and the Future of the Holy City

MICHAEL DUMPER
Copyright Date: 2014
DOI: 10.7312/dump16196
Pages: 360
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/dump16196
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  • Book Info
    Jerusalem Unbound
    Book Description:

    Jerusalem's formal political borders reveal neither the dynamics of power in the city nor the underlying factors that make an agreement between Israel and the Palestinians so difficult. The lines delineating Israeli authority are frequently different from those delineating segregated housing or areas of uneven service provision or parallel national electoral districts of competing educational jurisdictions. In particular, the city's large number of holy sites and restricted religious compounds create enclaves that continually threaten to undermine the Israeli state's authority and control over the city. This lack of congruity between political control and the actual spatial organization and everyday use of the city leaves many areas of occupied East Jerusalem in a kind of twilight zone where citizenship, property rights, and the enforcement of the rule of law are ambiguously applied.

    Michael Dumper plots a history of Jerusalem that examines this intersecting and multileveled matrix and in so doing is able to portray the constraints on Israeli control over the city and the resilience of Palestinian enclaves after forty-five years of Israeli occupation. Adding to this complex mix is the role of numerous external influences -- religious, political, financial, and cultural -- so that the city is also a crucible for broader contestation. While the Palestinians may not return to their previous preeminence in the city, neither will Israel be able to assert a total and irreversible dominance. His conclusion is that the city will not only have to be shared, but that the sharing will be based upon these many borders and the interplay between history, geography, and religion.

    eISBN: 978-0-231-53735-3
    Subjects: Political Science, Sociology, History, Architecture and Architectural History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-vii)
  3. [Map]
    (pp. viii-viii)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-18)

    STANDING ON THE Mount of Olives that looks down over the historic centre of Jerusalem, an observer would be struck by several contradictory impressions. At first sight, she would notice the many and varied architectural styles that are scattered throughout the valleys and ridges below and even inside the walled Old City itself. From Chalcedonian shrines to Byzantine basilicas, from Mamluk domes and minarets to Ottoman fortifications, from British colonial facades to Israeli modernist high-rises and hotels, these all reflect the consecutive conquests and occupations that the city has been subjected to. Also from this vantage point, a long-sighted observer...

  7. 1 THE HARD BORDERS OF THE CITY
    (pp. 19-53)

    JUST AFTER LUNCH on August 9, 2001, a young Palestinian carrying a guitar case walked into Sbarro Pizzeria on the corner of King George and Jaffa Streets, in the heart of Israeli West Jerusalem. The small café and shop was milling with families, schoolchildren, teenagers, and passing tourists. When the guitar case exploded—packed as it was with nails, screws, and bolts—it ripped the place apart, killing fifteen people, including four children under the age of ten, and wounding ninety. It caused mayhem in the surrounding area as streets were blocked off, traffic halted, shoppers and office workers left...

  8. 2 THE “SOFTER” BORDERS OF THE CITY
    (pp. 54-96)

    I WAS BORN and brought up in West Malaysia, and in the 1960s as a family we spent our annual holidays exploring the upper reaches of the Pahang River. Our favorite spot was the National Park headquarters where the wide, muddy, and sluggish Tembeling River met the dark and swift-flowing waters of the Tahan. I recall playing frequently in the confluence of the two rivers and sometimes swimming across from one bank to the other. Once, after heavy rains, I was swept away by faster than usual currents and had to be rescued by my elder brother and a party...

  9. 3 THE SCATTERED BORDERS OF HOLINESS
    (pp. 97-145)

    FOR ALL ITS swirling tensions and frequent eruptions of violence, Jerusalem can still have its moments of pure magic. Occasionally you are captured by a sense of peace and tranquillity which can almost take your breath away. Paradoxically, one of the places you can most strongly feel this is in the eye of the storm—the Haram al-Sharif. Early on a crisp spring morning, when the sun is bright but has not yet reached its midday heat, and the colors are still rich and velvety with shadows, you can sit on the steps leading up to the Dome of the...

  10. 4 THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY AND THE LIMITS OF SOVEREIGNTY
    (pp. 146-185)

    JERUSALEM LIES ON the cusp of two environmental climates—the Mediterranean and the Arabian Desert. The climatic division almost follows the Green Line through the city, with the greener forested areas to the west falling down the valleys of the Judean and Samarian hills toward the coast and, in the east, the drier, more barren rocky ridges plummeting sharply down to the Jordan valley and the warm tepid waters of the Dead Sea.¹ At approximately 2,500 feet high, the altitude of the city can take you by surprise. In winter it can be both very cold and foggy and also...

  11. 5 JERUSALEM IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: WHAT PROSPECT OF PEACE?
    (pp. 186-236)

    RUNNING AND DIVIDED cities are not an obvious mix. However, during the course of my research for the Conflict in Cities project, I have had the chance to run round and through the cities of Belfast, Brussels, Mostar, Nicosia, Beirut, and Jerusalem. I tend to run early in the morning, and it is remarkable what a different kind of city you see at that time from the one you encounter later in the day. In the first place, at that time of the day the city is a city of cleaners and garbage collectors, noisily loading trucks and dustbins sweeping...

  12. APPENDIX: WEB SITE AND FACEBOOK SURVEYS
    (pp. 237-264)
  13. NOTES
    (pp. 265-306)
  14. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 307-324)
  15. INDEX
    (pp. 325-340)