Parental Monitoring of Adolescents

Parental Monitoring of Adolescents: Current Perspectives for Researchers and Practitioners

VINCENT GUILAMO-RAMOS
JAMES JACCARD
PATRICIA DITTUS
Copyright Date: 2010
Pages: 312
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/guil14080
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  • Book Info
    Parental Monitoring of Adolescents
    Book Description:

    The close supervision of adolescents dramatically reduces the incidence of risky sexual behavior, drug and alcohol use, and other activities that could negatively affect one's health and well-being. Because of the strong correlation between parental monitoring and a child's welfare, social workers, psychologists, child development specialists, and other professionals who work with children now incorporate monitoring into their programs and practice.

    A definitive resource providing the best research and techniques for productive supervision within the home, this volume defines and develops the conceptual, methodological, and practical areas of parental monitoring and monitoring research, locating the right balance of closeness and supervision while also remaining sensitive to ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Assembled by leading experts on childrearing and healthy parent-child communication, Parental Monitoring of Adolescents identifies the conditions that best facilitate parental knowledge, ideal interventions for high-risk youth, and the factors that either help or hinder the monitoring of an adolescent's world. The volume also sets a course for future research, establishing a new framework that evaluates the nature and approach of monitoring within the parent-adolescent relationship and the particular social realities of everyday life.

    eISBN: 978-0-231-52011-9
    Subjects: Sociology, Psychology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Preface
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. xi-xii)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. xiii-xxii)
    VINCENT GUILAMO-RAMOS, JAMES JACCARD and PATRICIA DITTUS

    In recent years, interest in the role of parental monitoring has grown considerably. Parental monitoring traditionally has been defined as the acquisition of knowledge about the activities, whereabouts, and companions of one’s son or daughter. Understanding the causes, correlates, and consequences of parental monitoring and adolescents’ willingness to be monitored is of keen interest to developmental scientists and applied professionals. There is a large body of literature in the health, social, and psychological sciences on the nature, extent, antecedents, and consequences of parental monitoring during childhood, adolescence, and the transition into adulthood From this body of literature, we know that...

  6. Part I Contemporary Issues in Parental Monitoring

    • 1 Parental Monitoring: A Critical Examination of the Research
      (pp. 3-38)
      HÅKAN STATTIN, MARGARET KERR and LAUREE TILTON-WEAVER

      In most Western societies, as children move through adolescence they spend increasing amounts of time away from home. At about the same time in development, rates of delinquency, alcohol drinking, and drug use rise precipitously. In the quest to understand why this increase happens and to find ways to prevent problem behavior, it has been logical and intuitively appealing to examine the role parents play. For almost three decades, the strongest results coming from studies connecting adolescent problem behavior with parenting have been for what has been called parental monitoring. Our knowledge about what is called parental monitoring and its...

    • 2 Developmental and Interactional Antecedents of Monitoring in Early Adolescence
      (pp. 39-66)
      ROBERT D. LAIRD, MATTHEW M. MARRERO and JENNIFER K. SHERWOOD

      For much of the past century, scientists from a number of disciplines have been describing and categorizing behaviors that parents engage in as they raise their children and adolescents. Numerous scholars have sought to determine whether these parenting behaviors are associated with developmental outcomes. In contrast, how parents come to engage in specific behaviors or why parents employ particular parenting techniques remains largely unexplored. Moreover, researchers have yet to identify general principles for describing optimal and less optimal shifts in parenting strategies as children become adolescents (Collins 1995; Cowan, Powell, & Cowan 1998). The purpose of this chapter is to begin...

    • 3 Impediments to Parental Monitoring in the After-School Hours: A Qualitative Analysis
      (pp. 67-89)
      DEBORAH BELLE and BRENDA PHILLIPS

      Parents who are knowledgeable about their children’s activities, whereabouts, and friends are more likely than less knowledgeable parents to have well-adjusted children who avoid risky behaviors, as many studies show (Crouter & Head 2002; Dishion & McMahon 1998; Fletcher, Darling, & Steinberg 1995; Hayes, Hudson, & Matthews 2004; Laird et al. 2003a; Laird et al. 2003b). Although the positive association between parental knowledge and children’s adjustment is firmly established, there is not agreement about the reasons for this association. Current debate centers on the extent to which active parental monitoring or voluntary child disclosure accounts for the larger share of the association (Fletcher, Steinberg,...

    • 4 Cross-Cultural Analysis of Parental Monitoring and Adolescent Problem Behavior: Theoretical Challenges of Model Replication When East Meets West
      (pp. 90-123)
      SONIA VENKATRAMAN, THOMAS J. DISHION, JEFF KIESNER and FRANÇOIS POULIN

      It goes without saying that the dynamics and mechanisms of childrearing are likely to vary across cultures (Whiting & Edwards 1988). A corollary of this understanding is that the more closely two cultures resemble one another, the more likely they are to share childrearing patterns and mechanisms, as compared to those that are dramatically different. Thus, it is critical that etiological research on both adolescent problem behavior and emotional adjustment within a variety of cultural contexts be conducted to provide data that would generate new theoretical understanding of human behavior and psychopathology. Many people would agree with this claim without thinking...

    • 5 When Is Parenting Over? Examining Parental Monitoring and High-risk Alcohol Consumption in Young Adult College Students
      (pp. 124-146)
      ROB TURRISI, ANNE E. RAY and CAITLIN ABAR

      During childhood, parental monitoring can take on different forms such as direct behavioral observation or communication. For example, parents may watch their children play at a park or near a busy street or they may want to know where they are going and with whom after school hours. Both types of monitoring are intended to make sure that children are safe and away from situations where there is danger. Early on, there is more of the former monitoring approach and less of the latter. However, as children develop into their teen years, this trend reverses. Although there are still opportunities...

    • 6 From Research to Practice: Development and Scaling Up of ImPACT, a Parental Monitoring Intervention for African American Parents of Adolescents
      (pp. 147-175)
      JENNIFER S. GALBRAITH and BONITA STANTON

      Scientists working in prevention fields are increasingly calling for the widespread use of evidenced-based interventions (EBIs) to stimulate and sustain behavior change. At the same time, funding agencies more and more are requiring the use of EBIs. Simultaneously, there is mounting evidence that intervening with parents is an effective approach to adolescent behavior change. This chapter will follow the development of one community-based, parental monitoring HIV-prevention intervention designed for parents of African American, low-income, urban youth from its earliest creation to efforts to scale up the program for national dissemination. It will describe both the original evaluation and a second...

    • 7 A Three-Process System of Parental Monitoring and Supervision
      (pp. 176-204)
      JAMES JACCARD, VINCENT GUILAMO-RAMOS, ALIDA BOURIS and PATRICIA DITTUS

      The strategy of increasing the amount and quality of parental monitoring during early adolescence holds considerable promise for reducing adolescent risk behavior. Studies suggest that parental monitoring of adolescents lessens the likelihood of problem behaviors in early to middle adolescence (e.g., Barnes et al. 2000; Dishion & McMahon 1998; Fletcher, Darling, & Steinberg 1995; Patterson & Stouthamer-Loeber 1984). However, research also suggests that parents of high-risk youth often disengage from monitoring during middle adolescence (Dishon, Nelson, & Kavanagh 2003) and that monitoring among parents tends to decrease as adolescents progress from middle to late adolescence.

      This chapter draws upon and extends parental monitoring and...

  7. Part II Expert Perspectives on Parental Monitoring

    • [Part II Introduction]
      (pp. 205-266)

      In this portion of the book, we adopt a more informal approach to gaining insights into parental monitoring. We (Guilamo-Ramos, Jaccard, and Dittus) posed seven questions to a senior author of every chapter in part I and asked all of them to answer the same questions, albeit in an informal way, based on their expert knowledge and their sense of the field more generally. In this section, we present each question and then share the answers of the experts. This is followed by a commentary by us on the the answers that were given to that particular question. The idea...

  8. List of Contributors
    (pp. 267-270)
  9. Index
    (pp. 271-288)