Social Work Values and Ethics

Social Work Values and Ethics

Frederic G. Reamer
Copyright Date: 2006
Edition: 3
Pages: 256
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/ream13788
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  • Book Info
    Social Work Values and Ethics
    Book Description:

    This is the leading introduction 200to professional values and ethics in social work. Frederic G. Reamer provides social workers with a succinct and comprehensive overview of the most critical issues relating to professional values and ethics, including the nature of social work values, ethical dilemmas, and professional misconduct. Conceptually rich and attuned to the complexities of ethical decision making, Social Work Values and Ethics is unique in striking the right balance between history, theory, and practical application.

    For the third edition, Reamer has updated the content and strengthened the relevance of the case material. Also new to the third edition:

    o Discussion of the moral dialogue between practitioner and cliento Coverage of virtue ethicso Practical discussion of concepts underlying social work ethicso Expanded application of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics to ethical dilemmas in the professiono A look at the historical evolution of ethical standards in social worko New vignettes, illustrating difficult ethical decisionso More guidance on informed consent and termination of serviceso Discussion questions at the end of each chaptero A section on how to conduct a social work ethics audit

    eISBN: 978-0-231-51104-9
    Subjects: Philosophy, Sociology

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. ix-xiv)
  4. 1 SOCIAL WORK VALUES AND ETHICS: An Overview
    (pp. 1-10)

    Imagine that you are a social worker at a local community mental health center. You spend most of your time providing supportive and casework services to individuals and families experiencing some sort of difficulty. You have worked at the agency for about three years.

    During the past two months you have provided counseling to Sarah Robinson and her two children, Brooks, seven, and Frank, four. Robinson originally sought help at the agency because of difficulty she was having managing Brooks’s behavior. According to Robinson, Brooks “frequently throws temper tantrums when he’s upset—he can really kick and scream.” Robinson also...

  5. 2 SOCIAL WORK VALUES
    (pp. 11-42)

    Stephanie P. recently received her master’s degree in social work. She is about to embark on the first stage of her social work career. Stephanie P. worked as a teacher’s aide in a preschool program located in a suburb of a major city before enrolling in the master’s program at a nearby university.

    Stephanie P. hopes to be “a psychotherapist working with individuals, couples, and families. When I was younger, my family received counseling help from a social worker, and since then I’ve always wanted to be a therapist.”

    Stephanie P. knows that she must obtain considerable experience before venturing...

  6. 3 ETHICAL DILEMMAS AND DECISION MAKING: A Framework
    (pp. 43-86)

    Hinda B., a social worker, is clinical director at the Mt. Washington Women’s Shelter. The shelter provides temporary housing and counseling for women who have been battered by their partners. The shelter has room for eight women and their children.

    Mary M. and her two children have been at the shelter for six weeks. This is the family’s third stay at the shelter. Mary M. reports that she has been battered by her husband “off and on for about two years. He has a real serious drinking problem. When he’s sober, he’s not too bad. But when he gets that...

  7. 4 ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN SOCIAL WORK: Direct Practice
    (pp. 87-122)

    Social workers encounter a wide range of ethical dilemmas. In general, these fall into two groups: ethical dilemmas involving work with individual clients, families, and small groups (direct practice), and ethical dilemmas involving activities such as community organizing, advocacy, social policy and planning, administration, and research and evaluation (indirect practice). In this chapter I focus on ethical dilemmas in direct practice and apply the decision-making framework introduced in chapter 3. Chapter 5 focuses on ethical dilemmas in indirect practice.

    Ethical dilemmas in direct practice involve a number of issues. Among the most prominent themes are confidentiality and privacy; self-determination and...

  8. 5 ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN SOCIAL WORK: Indirect Practice
    (pp. 123-154)

    As chapter 4 discussed, many ethical dilemmas in social work are related to the delivery of services to individuals, families, and small groups, or what is generally known as direct practice. In addition, social workers encounter a wide variety of ethical dilemmas related to what I call indirect practice. Indirect practice includes such activities as community organization, advocacy and social action, social policy and planning, and social work administration. This chapter focuses on a number of ethical dilemmas that are prominent in these forms of indirect social work practice, including the allocation of limited resources; government and private sector responsibility...

  9. 6 ETHICS RISK MANAGEMENT AND ETHICAL MISCONDUCT
    (pp. 155-188)

    The preceding chapters have examined the nature of social work values, the process of ethical decision making, and various ethical dilemmas in social work practice. As I have shown, many ethical issues that practitioners encounter raise difficult philosophical questions—for example, whether social workers are always obligated to be truthful and to respect clients’ right to self-determination, how limited resources should be allocated, and when social workers should blow the whistle on unethical practices.

    Many of these ethical issues do not raise legal questions or issues that would warrant discipline by a regulatory body, such as a state licensing board,...

  10. AFTERWORD A Future Agenda
    (pp. 189-194)

    The subject of social work values and ethics is clearly diverse. It includes topics as different as the core values of the profession and malpractice suits. Analysis of these issues incorporates diverse bodies of knowledge ranging from moral philosophy to legal theories of negligence. To understand contemporary issues of professional values and ethics adequately, today’s social workers must grasp an impressive array of concepts, many of which were unknown to earlier generations of practitioners.

    In these pages I have examined a complex mix of issues. I have explored the nature of social work values and their relevance to the profession’s...

  11. REFERENCES
    (pp. 195-208)
  12. APPENDIX NASW CODE OF ETHICS
    (pp. 209-228)
  13. INDEX
    (pp. 229-242)