The Remains of Being

The Remains of Being: Hermeneutic Ontology After Metaphysics

SANTIAGO ZABALA
Copyright Date: 2009
DOI: 10.7312/zaba14830
Pages: 178
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7312/zaba14830
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  • Book Info
    The Remains of Being
    Book Description:

    In Basic Concepts, Heidegger claims that "Being is the most worn-out" and yet also that Being "remains constantly available." Santiago Zabala radicalizes the consequences of these little known but significant affirmations. Revisiting the work of Jacques Derrida, Reiner Schürmann, Jean-Luc Nancy, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Ernst Tugendhat, and Gianni Vattimo, he finds these remains of Being within which ontological thought can still operate.

    Being is an event, Zabala argues, a kind of generosity and gift that generates astonishment in those who experience it. This sense of wonder has fueled questions of meaning for centuries-from Plato to the present day. Postmetaphysical accounts of Being, as exemplified by the thinkers of Zabala's analysis, as well as by Nietzsche, Dewey, and others he encounters, don't abandon Being. Rather, they reject rigid, determined modes of essentialist thought in favor of more fluid, malleable, and adaptable conceptions, redefining the pursuit and meaning of philosophy itself.

    eISBN: 978-0-231-52004-1
    Subjects: Philosophy

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-viii)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. ix-x)
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. xi-xvi)
  4. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xvii-xx)
  5. INTRODUCTION
    (pp. 1-24)

    If the real task of modern as well as ancient philosophy has been to raise the question of the meaning of Being, since it has always been interpreted as being-present-at-hand, Vorhandenheit, the moment has come, after its destruction, to question the remains of Being. If Being, after the destruction of metaphysics, is no longer something present, something of which we may ask, “What is it?” then it is something that, regardless of what we do with it, remains. And it remains because ontology is nothing other than the sending of Being, Geschick des Seins, as presence, Anwesenheit. But as presence,...

  6. 1. BEING DESTROYED: HEIDEGGER'S DESTRUCTION OF BEING AS PRESENCE
    (pp. 25-52)

    Today, in 2009, only thirty-three years after heidegger’s death, and while we are still waiting for more than twenty volumes of his complete works (from a total of 102 volumes, not counting his correspondence)¹ to be published, there is no question that his thinking has changed philosophy forever. This is not because there is more secondary literature on him than on any other philosopher of the twentieth century,² including Ludwig Wittgenstein, nor because every philosopher after the publication of Being and Time had to, directly or indirectly, come to terms with his thought, including Wittgenstein himself,³ nor even because Heidegger...

  7. 2. AFTER THE DESTRUCTION: THE REMAINS OF BEING
    (pp. 53-98)

    For many interpreters of heidegger, his gesture of raising again the fundamental problem of Being should not be understood only as the repetition of the forgotten inauguration, origin, anfang of thought but also as evidence that he was searching for the original experience of Being. This original Being would signify that behind the Greek language there is another “unthought language” that presupposes an archioriginary intactness that has been forgotten and that we should appropriate. Such a Being would represent a founding and controlling principle. If this were the case, then Heidegger was actually looking for the one and only adequate...

  8. 3. GENERATING BEING THROUGH INTERPRETATION: THE HERMENEUTIC ONTOLOGY OF REMNANTS
    (pp. 99-120)

    In this last chapter, i am going to try not only to explain where philosophy goes from this ontology of remnants or philosophy of remains but also to give a function to this same ontology through its logic. In other words, I am going to show how hermeneutics is the philosophy of generation, that is, that which generates Being. But how can it generate Being if, as I said, “to on,” “es gibt Sein,” and “il y a de l’être” always already? In order to answer this question, we need to further specify the hermeneutic ontology that has been guiding...

  9. NOTES
    (pp. 121-150)
  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 151-170)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 171-180)