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Demosthenes, Speeches 60 and 61, Prologues, Letters

Translated with introduction and notes by Ian Worthington
SERIES EDITOR MICHAEL GAGARIN
Copyright Date: 2006
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7560/713314
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    Demosthenes, Speeches 60 and 61, Prologues, Letters
    Book Description:

    This is the tenth volume in the Oratory of Classical Greece. This series presents all of the surviving speeches from the late fifth and fourth centuries BC in new translations prepared by classical scholars who are at the forefront of the discipline. These translations are especially designed for the needs and interests of today's undergraduates, Greekless scholars in other disciplines, and the general public.

    Classical oratory is an invaluable resource for the study of ancient Greek life and culture. The speeches offer evidence on Greek moral views, social and economic conditions, political and social ideology, law and legal procedure, and other aspects of Athenian culture that have recently been attracting particular interest: women and family life, slavery, and religion, to name just a few.

    Demosthenes is regarded as the greatest orator of classical antiquity. This volume contains his Funeral Oration (Speech 60) for those who died in the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC, in which Philip of Macedonia secured his dominance over Greece, as well as the so-called Erotic Essay (Speech 61), a rhetorical exercise in which the speaker eulogizes the youth Epicrates for his looks and physical prowess and encourages him to study philosophy in order to become a virtuous and morally upright citizen. The volume also includes fifty-six prologues (the openings to political speeches to the Athenian Assembly) and six letters apparently written during the orator's exile from Athens. Because so little literature survives from the 330s and 320s BC, these works provide valuable insights into Athenian culture and politics of that era.

    eISBN: 978-0-292-79576-1
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. SERIES EDITOR’S PREFACE
    (pp. ix-x)
    Michael Gagarin
  4. TRANSLATOR’S ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    (pp. xi-xii)
    Ian Worthington
  5. SPEECH NUMBERS AND TITLES
    (pp. xiii-xvi)
  6. SERIES INTRODUCTION Greek Oratory
    (pp. xvii-2)
    Michael Gagarin

    From as early as Homer (and undoubtedly much earlier) the Greeks placed a high value on effective speaking. Even Achilles, whose greatness was primarily established on the battlefield, was brought up to be “a speaker of words and a doer of deeds” (Iliad9.443); and Athenian leaders of the sixth and fifth centuries,¹ such as Solon, Themistocles, and Pericles, were all accomplished orators. Most Greek literary genres—notably epic, tragedy, and history—underscore the importance of oratory by their inclusion of set speeches. The formal pleadings of the envoys to Achilles in theIliad, the messenger speeches in tragedy reporting...

  7. INTRODUCTION TO DEMOSTHENES
    (pp. 3-7)
    Michael Gagarin

    Since antiquity Demosthenes (384–322 bc) has usually been judged the greatest of the Attic orators. Although the patriotic and nationalistic tenor of his message has been more highly regarded in some periods of history than in others, he is unique in his mastery of so many different rhetorical styles and his ability to blend them into a powerful ensemble.

    Demosthenes was born into an old wealthy Athenian family. His father Demosthenes owned workshops that made swords and furniture. His maternal grandfather, Gylon, had been exiled from Athens and lived in the Crimea, where his mother Cleobule was born (perhaps...

  8. INTRODUCTION TO THIS VOLUME
    (pp. 8-18)
    Ian Worthington

    Contained herein are theFuneral Oration(epitaphios) for those who died in the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 (60), theErotic Essay, of unknown date (61), 56 (or, rather, 55)¹Prologues(prooimia) or openings of political speeches, also of unknown date, and sixLetters, apparently written during Demosthenes’ exile (323 to 322) for his part in the Harpalus affair of 324/3. All of these works are grouped together at the end of the Demosthenic corpus since it was common practice by ancient compilers to place such works at the end of a corpus. The only important studies of them in...

  9. DEMOSTHENES, SPEECHES 60 AND 61, PROLOGUES, LETTERS
    (pp. 19-134)

    Demosthenes was chosen by the Athenians to deliver theFuneral Oration(epitaphios) over those Athenians who had died fighting Philip II of Macedonia at the Battle of Chaeronea in September 338 (Dem. 18.285, Plut.,Demosthenes21.2). Athens was the onlypolisin Greece to honor those who had recently died in battle with a public oration (Dem. 20.141), and this solemn ceremony, attended by foreigners as well as citizens, followed a rigid procedure. Although our principal source is the later fifth-century historian Thucydides (2.34), there is no reason to think that the procedure as he described it had changed by...

  10. BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR THIS VOLUME
    (pp. 135-138)
  11. INDEX
    (pp. 139-142)