Bedside Manners

Bedside Manners: Play and Workbook

SUZANNE GORDON
LISA HAYES
SCOTT REEVES
Foreword by Lucian L. Leape
Copyright Date: 2013
Published by: Cornell University Press,
Pages: 96
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctt32b5rq
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  • Book Info
    Bedside Manners
    Book Description:

    In recent years, there has been growing awareness of the need for interprofessional cooperation in healthcare. Countless studies have shown that genuine teamwork and team intelligence are critical to patient safety. Poor communication among health care personnel is a major factor in hospital errors, even more so than the level of staff competence and experience. This is why many schools for health professionals and major health care employers now promote interprofessional education and cooperation.

    Bedside Manners is a play about workplace relations among physicians, nurses, others who work in health care, and patients-and how their interaction affects the quality of patient care, for better or worse. The accompanying workbook helps educators, managers, patient safety advocates, administrators, and union representatives to analyze and discuss the issues raised in the play. When presented in hospitals, universities, and health care conferences all over the United States, Bedside Manners invariably sparks a vibrant conversation about patient safety problems and how to solve them, job satisfaction and stress, and the importance of information sharing and mutual respect. As text or script, this play is a unique teaching tool for medical and nursing schools, and other health professional schools and continuing education programs involving health care clinicians and staff of all kinds.

    eISBN: 978-0-8014-6922-0
    Subjects: Health Sciences

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. Foreword
    (pp. vii-viii)
    Lucian L. Leape

    To an outside observer it seems a curious paradox that those who work in health care, the most caring of professions, so often seem to care so little for one another. That’s not fair, of course. Most of us doctors and nurses get along well most of the time. Truly disruptive behavior is relatively rare. But lesser frictions abound and are major detractors from finding joy and meaning in work. High burnout rates among doctors, nurses, and even medical students reflect not only heavy workloads and long hours but also unhappy and stressful interpersonal relationships. Some studies indicate that disrespectful...

  4. Acknowledgments
    (pp. ix-xii)
  5. Introduction
    (pp. 1-6)
    Suzanne Gordon

    The play Bedside Manners began with a conversation on an airplane. Almost ten years ago, I was flying to Seattle to give a lecture and began what I thought would be a casual chat with my seatmate. The young woman sitting next to me was a pediatric resident at Boston Children’s Hospital. Along with dozens of other pediatricians on the plane, she was traveling to a national meeting in Seattle. When I told her that I wrote about nursing and health care, we launched into what became a cross-country discussion about team relationships.

    She was in her second year of...

  6. PART 1 BEDSIDE MANNERS: THE PLAY
    (pp. 9-40)
    Suzanne Gordon and Lisa Hayes

    Nurses 1, 2 and Doctors 1, 2: Of mixed ages and generations. Each actor plays several different nurses and doctors.

    Leah Jones: Mid-to-late fifties. Narrator of the story, a wise observer of the health care system as a former nurse now experiencing the “other side of the stethoscope.”

    Nurse Sally Grant: Early forties. Has been a nurse for twenty years, fifteen years on this medical-surgical (med-surg) unit. Has mastered the skill of communicating her medical assessment so that interns understand potential ramifications of decisions.

    Dr. Michael Evans: Early thirties. Was an intern on med-surg unit. Has learned to listen to...

  7. PART 2 BEDSIDE MANNERS: THE WORKBOOK
    (pp. 43-94)
    Suzanne Gordon and Scott Reeves

    Bedside Manners is a teaching tool designed to help health care professionals explore the vexing problem of interprofessional collaboration and teamwork.¹ Based on real people and situations, the play provides a nonthreatening entry point to a discussion of a range of interprofessional issues linked to delivering care in a safe and effective manner. The play and workbook explore the sometimes harsh reality that is all too often obfuscated by the rhetoric of teamwork, patient safety, and concern about patient outcomes. Performing, viewing, discussing, and analyzing the play can serve to help people generate a deeper understanding of the infrastructure on...

  8. Notes
    (pp. 95-96)
  9. About the Authors
    (pp. 97-98)