Erichthonius and the Three Daughters Of Cecrops

Erichthonius and the Three Daughters Of Cecrops

CHARLES EDWIN BENNETT
JOHN ROBERT SITLINGTON STERRETT
GEORGE PRENTICE BRISTOL
BENJAMIN POWELL
Volume: 17
Copyright Date: 1906
Published by: Cornell University Press
Pages: 106
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.cttq44bt
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  • Book Info
    Erichthonius and the Three Daughters Of Cecrops
    Book Description:

    The myth of Erichthonius and the Three Daughters of Cecrops must be one of the most ancient at Athens. In this work, Benjamin Powell studies the sources for this particular myth to understand it as fully as possible. Treating the subject broadly, he takes into account the many changes and influences, even if peculiar or contradictory that come into the history of the myth. Powell provides a complete survey of the myth and its sources: the etymology of names, whether the divine personage in question was a personification of some natural phenomenon, or a beast, bird, reptile or insect, a totem, a spirit of the crops, or an historical personage. He begins his discussion with the different classical accounts of the myth and then offers explanations of its meaning and that of the ritual connected with it, often taking an anthropology approach.

    eISBN: 978-0-8014-6659-5
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. [i]-[iii])
  2. EDITORS’ PREFACE
    (pp. [iv]-[iv])
  3. PREFACE
    (pp. [v]-[v])
  4. ERICHTHONIUS AND THE THREE DAUGHTERS OP CECROPS.
    (pp. 1-55)

    Antigonus Carystius (Historiae Mirabiles, xii)¹ quotes Amele-sagoras, the Athenian, who is telling the reason why no crow flies over the Acropolis, and why no one could say that he had ever seen one. He gives a mythological cause. “The goddess Athena was given as a wife to Hephaestus, but when she had lain down with him, she disappeared and Hephaestus, falling to the ground, spent his seed. The earth afterwards gave birth to Erichthonius, whom Athena nourished and shut up in a chest. This chest she gave into the keeping of the daughters of Cecrops, Agraulus, Pandrosus and Herse and...

  5. LITERARY SOURCES
    (pp. 56-86)
  6. [ILLUSTRATIONS]
    (pp. None)
  7. Back Matter
    (pp. 87-87)