Studies in Latin Moods and Tenses

Studies in Latin Moods and Tenses

HERBERT CHARLES ELMER
BENJAMIN IDE WHEELER
CHARLES EDWIN BENNETT
GEORGE PRENTICE BRISTOL
Volume: 6
Copyright Date: 1898
Published by: Cornell University Press
Pages: 240
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.cttq44t3
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  • Book Info
    Studies in Latin Moods and Tenses
    Book Description:

    This work contradicts claims by Latin grammarians that in certain expressions the present and perfect tenses of the subjunctive are used without difference. At the same time, it establishes between these two tenses certain important and clearly-marked distinctions as used in prayers, in expressions of contingent futurity, and in expression which have been mistakenly appealed to as instances of a potential subjunctive.

    eISBN: 978-0-8014-6648-9
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-ix)
  3. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.
    (pp. 1-14)

    The following pages are offered primarily in the hope of proving unjust the claims of Latin grammarians that in certain expressions the present and perfect tenses of the subjunctive are used without difference of meaning, and of establishing between these two tenses certain important and clearly-marked distinctions. I emphasize thus the primary aim I have in view in order that my peculiar system of classification may be better understood. Had my intention been to give a minute classification showing all the various shades of meaning of the subjunctive mood, with the relative frequency of each use, I should have followed...

  4. I. Tenses in Volitive And Optative Expressions.
    (pp. 15-113)

    In many of the passages cited below, the emotion of the speaker will be perfectly evident. Where this is not the case, however, I have added such comments as seemed desirable, for the purpose of refreshing the reader’s memory regarding the context in which the passage is found, the character of the person speaking, etc., etc. It should be noticed—and this is a point which I wish particularly to emphasize—that the verbs used in these expressions are, in nearly every case, such as may be naturally associated with quick or energetic action. The importance of noticing this fact...

  5. II. TENSES IN EXPRESSIONS OF CONTINGENT FUTURITY.
    (pp. 114-174)

    In attempting to determine the distinction between the tenses in expressions of contingent futurity, we may start with the same general principles which I have laid down in Part I in discussing the volitive subjunctive. In the present tense we may still look for progress and deliberate action; in the perfect for a hurried leap over the beginning and the progress of the act and a concentration of the attention upon its full and complete accomplishment in the future. However, the application of this fundamental idea to these particular expressions would lead one to expect, in the perfect tense, results...

  6. III. THE SUPPOSED POTENTIAL USE OF THE SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD.
    (pp. 175-231)

    To my mind, no part of our Latin Grammars is less satisfactory than that which treats of the so-called “Potential Subjunctive”. The sections devoted to this subject seem to me a conglomeration of misconceptions, groundless theories and false logic. In the first place, the term “Potential” itself, as used in our grammars, seems unwarranted. It is used to include the wide sweep of ideas covered by nearly all the various auxiliary verbs in the English language, indicating all the concepts represented by “may”, “can”, “might”, “could”, “would”, “should”, and “must”.

    The term “Potential” can properly, it seems to me, be...

  7. Back Matter
    (pp. 232-232)