The Epigraphical Evidence for the Reigns of Vespasian and Titus

The Epigraphical Evidence for the Reigns of Vespasian and Titus

CHARLES EDWIN BENNETT
JOHN ROBERT SITLINGTON STERRETT
GEORGE PRENTICE BRISTOL
Volume: 16
Copyright Date: 1901
Published by: Cornell University Press
Pages: 148
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.cttq44xf
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  • Book Info
    The Epigraphical Evidence for the Reigns of Vespasian and Titus
    Book Description:

    The study of inscriptions and the evidence gathered from monuments of past ages are greatly changing our histories of ancient Greece and Rome. By means of them disputed points are settled with certainty, dates are fixed, and innumerable facts are brought to light that could never have been learned from our extant literary sources.

    Hence it is that no historian of the present day can afford to neglect the science of epigraphy. This is true for any period from the late republic down to the fourth century of the empire, but it is especially true for the period of the Flavian emperors. Students of Roman history have suffered an irreparable loss from the fact that the Histories of Tacitus have survived only ill a fragmentary form, breaking off just after the accession of Vespasian. Through this misfortune we are confined almost solely to the meager outlines of Suetonius and Dio Cassius for the facts of the reigns of Vespasian and Titus.

    Under these circumstances the knowledge gained from the inscriptions of this period becomes invaluable. In this book, Homer Curtis Newton gathers all epigraphical evidence pertaining to the reigns of Vespasian and Titus, arranges it in convenient order for historical study, and appends such comments and cross-references in order to enhance their intrinsic value. Drawing on the Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum and other collections, in particular those of Orelli-Henzen, Wilmanns, and Dessau, Newton has made as complete a collection of inscription on this subject as possible.

    eISBN: 978-0-8014-6658-8
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. AN INSCRIPTION OF VESPASIAN BEFORE HIS PRINCIPATE.
    (pp. 1-129)

    The date of this inscription is not determined. It is before Vespasian became emperor, but, judging from the prominence of the men by whom he was chosen umpire, probably after he had won some distinction.

    Piso Frugi, or L.Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus¹, was the adopted son and destined successor of Galba, but enjoyed for only four days the distinction of being head of the empire, when he was slain in the insurrection of Otho. Scribonianus, or Licinius Crassus Scribonianus², was a prominent senator who was offered the empire by Antonius Primus, but refused it. It is a curious coincidence that...

  4. ADDENDA ET CORRIGENDA.
    (pp. 130-130)
  5. CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX OF INSCRIPTIONS.
    (pp. 131-134)
  6. LIST OF SUFFECT CONSULS.
    (pp. 135-135)
  7. INDEX OF NAMES.
    (pp. 136-140)
  8. Back Matter
    (pp. 141-142)