A Study of the Greek Paean, with Appendixes containing the Hymns Found at Delphi and the Other Extant Fragments of Paeans

A Study of the Greek Paean, with Appendixes containing the Hymns Found at Delphi and the Other Extant Fragments of Paeans

CHARLES EDWIN BENNETT
GEORGE PRENTICE BRISTOL
Volume: 12
Copyright Date: 1900
Published by: Cornell University Press
Pages: 174
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.cttq458b
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    A Study of the Greek Paean, with Appendixes containing the Hymns Found at Delphi and the Other Extant Fragments of Paeans
    Book Description:

    This study of the paean was undertaken with the purpose of determining more accurately the meaning of the word as used by the tragedians. It soon became evident that an examination of the whole subject was necessary in order to understand the different uses of the word, as well as the place of the hymn itself in Greek cultus. In the first appendix, the author has reprinted the paeans and fragments of paeans that are preserved to us; and in a second appendix, he has reprinted with some comments the hymns found at Delphi, to all of which the name paean may be applied.

    eISBN: 978-0-8014-6654-0
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-ix)
  3. INTRODUCTION.
    (pp. 1-3)

    In this list of Greek hymns the paean challenges our attention as the word which is both a general name for hymn, and a particular name for the hymn to Apollo. The word paean more than any other (except perhaps the very general word ǔμvos) is used for the hymn as a part of the religious service, so that a study of the paean is important for the history of Greek religion. More specifically it is used for a particular hymn in the service of Apollo, while at the same time the word is used as an epithet for Apollo...

  4. CHAPTER I. THE GOD PAIAN.
    (pp. 4-13)

    In the fifth book of the Iliad⁴ we read that Paieon applied soothing herbs to wounds of the gods and healed them “in the house of Zeus on high Olympos.” In the Odyssey⁵ the physicians of Egypt are said to be of the stock of Paieon ; i. e., Paieon appears as a minor god, the physician of the Olympic deities,⁶ and the patron or ancestor of human physicians. It is part of what has been called the rationalism of Homer that magic has little or no place in the epic world (although cf. Odyss. xix, 441 f.) ; and...

  5. CHAPTER II. THE PAEAN A HYMN USED TO AVERT ILLS.
    (pp. 14-17)

    No sharp line can be drawn between the passages in which the paean is distinctly a prayer for relief sung by those who are suffering from pestilence or from some other ill,30 and passages in which it denotes a hymn used in worship. In each case it usually accompanies a sacrifice, and in ordinary worship the element of petition is rarely wanting; e.g., Iliad, I, 472 f.³¹ might be discussed under the more general heading of the paean as used in worship, and on the other hand Eurip. Alc. 424130, Iph. Taur. 179127, are examples of worship offered at a...

  6. CHAPTER III. THE PAEAN A HYMN USED BEFORE IMPORTANT UNDERTAKINGS.41
    (pp. 18-24)

    In Greek religion, worship to avert a present evil, and worship before an event which might bring great evil, were intimately connected ; the “sin-offering” was a sacrifice offered both in misfortune to secure relief, and also, in identical manner, before an important or dangerous undertaking to prevent an evil outcome. Similarly the paean, although it does not seem to be closely connected with these σφáγιa, is none the less appropriate to both classes of occasions ; so that the use of the paean before important undertakings, and in particular before battle, may be interpreted as a form of the...

  7. CHAPTER IV. THE PAEAN A HYMN USED IN WORSHIP.
    (pp. 25-44)

    According to the grammarians the paean was originally a hymn used in the worship of Apollo, or of Apollo and Artemis ; only later did it come to be used in the service of other gods. The intimate connection of this hymn with the worship of Apollo has already been mentioned, and an examination of the passages will make ‘it perfectly evident. In Chapter II mention has already been made of the passage Iliad I, 47231;—after the sacrifice the Achaian youths were propitiating Apollo all the day long, singing beautiful paeans and dancing, greatly to the god’s delight. After...

  8. CHAPTER VI ON THE FORM OF THE PAEAN USED IN WORSHIP.
    (pp. 45-55)

    We have no data for determining the form of the original paean which was used as a healing song, and we have seen that the data for obtaining a definite conception of the battle paean are very few. In the one example of a paean prayer in time of need (Eurip. Iph. Taur. 1403 f.) which remains in full, the prayer itself was uttered by a single voice and the companions of Iphigeneia utter the refrain in a chorus. The examples of the paean used in worship which appear in Aristophanes suggest a similar form, but the paeans which remain...

  9. CHAPTER VI THE SYMPOSIAC PAEAN.
    (pp. 56-59)

    In spite of the comparatively frequent references to the paean at banquets, the later commentators make no specific reference to this use of the paean. The fact is explained, however, when we remember that the paean at the banquet was essentially the same thing as the paean at the sacrifice—viz., a hymn (to Apollo or some other god) accompanied by the libation. It is almost impossible to draw any sharp line between the sacrificial banquet and the ordinary banquet, for in early times every feast was in theory a sacrificial feast, and later the religious element was often present...

  10. CHAPTER VII. THE PAEAN OF VICTORY.
    (pp. 60-65)

    The word paean has been adopted in modern languages to mean a hymn of joy, more specifically a hymn of triumph. This meaning of the word goes back to Homer, but it becomes common only in later writers, where it tends to supersede other uses of the word205.

    On the occasion of a victory the expressions of joy take the form (a) of shouting by the army when they recognize their success, and by non-combatants who sympathize with them and join their shouts of joy ; (b) of a triumphant return of the army to the camp or to their...

  11. CONCLUSION.
    (pp. 66-67)

    It is now possible, as it was not possible to begin with, to define the paean in its relation to other types of religious hymns. The general word for hymn in religious worship is ǔμvoς ; special kinds of hymns are distinguished according to the god in whose honor they are sung, and the manner in which they are sung. The dithyramb is the choral hymn to Dionysos ; it is accompanied by the music of the flute, and the chorus perform an intricate, sometimes rather a wild, dance as they sing ; often two divisions of the chorus sing...

  12. TABLE
    (pp. 68-68)
  13. PASSAGES REFERRED TO.
    (pp. 69-100)
  14. APPENDIX I. EXTANT PAEANS AND FRAGMENTS OF PAEANS.
    (pp. 101-110)
  15. APPENDIX II. THE HYMNS DISCOVERED AT DELPHI.
    (pp. 111-154)
  16. INDEX OF PASSAGES CITED.
    (pp. 155-166)
  17. ADDENDA.
    (pp. 167-169)