Arthurian Literature XXV

Arthurian Literature XXV

ELIZABETH ARCHIBALD
DAVID F. JOHNSON
Copyright Date: 2008
Edition: NED - New edition
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 192
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt7zsspf
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  • Book Info
    Arthurian Literature XXV
    Book Description:

    The essays in this volume represent a wide range of Arthurian subjects, reaching as far back as the sixth century, and as far forward as the nineteenth; they include studies of Arthur as an icon of an independent England in the reign of Henry VIII, the source of Geoffrey of Monmouth's knowledge of Merlin, Malory's Morte Darthur, and the works of Chretien - both in literature and in depictions of scenes from his romances in ivory caskets from the Middle Ages and beyond. Of special interest is the appearance for the first time in print of a newly discovered Arthurian text: a letter in Anglo-Norman French purportedly written by Morgan le Fay. Elizabeth Archibald is Professor of English, University of Durham; DAVID F. JOHNSON is Professor of English, Florida State University. CONTRIBUTORS: CAROLYNE LARRINGTON, MARTINE MEUWESE, STEWART MOTTRAM, RALUCA RADULESCU, NICOLAI TOLSTOY, MICHAEL TWOMEY

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-611-3
    Subjects: Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. List of Illustrations
    (pp. vii-viii)
  4. General Editors’ Foreword
    (pp. ix-x)
    Elizabeth Archibald and David F. Johnson

    Volume XXV ofArthurian Literatureis the first under the co-editorship of Elizabeth Archibald and David F. Johnson. The editors would like to acknowledge the contributions and accomplishments of our predecessors, in particular Keith Busby, who was at the helm as General Editor from Volume XVII to Volume XXIV. We sincerely hope that the volumes we produce will continue the tradition of high quality established by those that have already appeared in this series. In the past general volumes have been alternated with ‘themed’ volumes. We will continue to encourage the submission of papers on specific themes, but we will...

  5. List of Contributors
    (pp. xi-xii)
  6. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. xiii-xiv)
  7. I GEOFFREY OF MONMOUTH AND THE MERLIN LEGEND
    (pp. 1-42)
    Nikolai Tolstoy

    In a recent study Oliver Padel subjected the origins of the Merlin/Myrddin legend to a careful re-examination.¹ A. O. H. Jarman contended that the name and prophetic character of Myrddin arose from nothing more than ætiological speculation on the placenameCaerfyrddin(Carmarthen), which in reality derives from British *Moridūnon(‘sea-town’). This shadowy figure subsequently acquired features of the legend of a North British wild man named Lailoken. Geoffrey of Monmouth absorbed this composite legend into hisHistoria Regum Britannie, to which he adapted Nennius’s account of the fatherless child Ambrosius.² He further placed a lengthy prophecy in the mouth of...

  8. II THE ENCHANTRESS, THE KNIGHT AND THE CLERIC: AUTHORIAL SURROGATES IN ARTHURIAN ROMANCE
    (pp. 43-66)
    Carolyne Larrington

    The clerics who composed historical works and vernacular romances in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries frequently figured themselves as authors and as clerks within their texts. Their self-depictions could vary widely, from thejongleurs(one eponymously named Juglet) in the work of Jean Renart and Gerbert de Montreuil, to the hermit, chosen by Christ, or the confessor-priest in theLancelot-GrailCycle, to the enchantress or magician, epitomized by Merlin himself.¹ Insular historians, as David Rollo has argued inGlamorous Sorcery, point up for their varying audiences – the literate and the not-so-literate – the possibility that their texts include both...

  9. III ‘MORGAN LE FAY, EMPRESS OF THE WILDERNESS’: A NEWLY RECOVERED ARTHURIAN TEXT IN LONDON, BL ROYAL 12.C.IX
    (pp. 67-92)
    Michael Twomey

    London, British Library MS Royal 12.C.ix is a collection of astronomical treatises and tables copied in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. The provenance of the manuscript before it belonged to John, Lord Lumley (1534?–1603), whoseex librisis on folio 1, is unknown.¹ Like many medieval books, Royal 12.C.ix contains notes by various hands written both in ink and in plummet (lead) on the flyleaves, spare folios, and blank spaces of the manuscript. Except for one note to be discussed momentarily, the notes are in Latin. At least one writer in this manuscript is responsible for astronomical and astrological...

  10. IV MALORY’S LANCELOT AND THE KEY TO SALVATION
    (pp. 93-118)
    Raluca L. Radulescu

    Critics have examined Malory’s Grail quest and the ‘The Healing of Sir Urry’ in light of his perceived tendency to favour chivalric adventures over spiritual perfection in the rest of hisMorte Darthur. In particular, Lancelot’s miracle in healing Urry may be seen as a fracture rather than an element of continuity in the post-Grail adventures.¹ Two questions are raised in this episode: how can Lancelot be the vehicle of a divine miracle unless he has truly repented in his heart, and if he has truly repented, how can he return to his sin with Guenevere? As I have shown...

  11. V CHRÉTIEN IN IVORY
    (pp. 119-152)
    Martine Meuwese

    After Lancelot has lost all his hair due to a medical treatment, he desires that the hair should be put into an ivory box and sent to Guenevere. When the Queen receives the box, she is delighted and kisses it as if it were a sacred relic.¹ Lancelot is no exception in giving his beloved lady an ivory box as a present. Luxury objects in ivory with secular images carved in low relief were often gifts from men to women as part of the rituals of courtship and marriage. In daily life, the small ivory boxes were probably used as...

  12. VI ‘AN EMPIRE OF ITSELF’: ARTHUR AS ICON OF AN ENGLISH EMPIRE, 1509–1547
    (pp. 153-174)
    Stewart Mottram

    InMonty Python and the Holy Grail(1975), King Arthur rides up to a peasant and declares himself ‘Arthur, king of the Britons’. When the peasant puzzlingly asks, ‘Who are the Britons?’, Arthur rather uncertainly replies that ‘We are all Britons.’¹ The year 1975 also saw the publication of J. G. A. Pocock’s groundbreaking article ‘British History: A Plea for a New Subject’.² Pocock sought to bridge the divide between anglocentric approaches to English history on the one hand, and isolationist approaches to Scottish, Welsh and Irish histories on the other. His article encouraged non-isolationist perspectives on British history, which...

  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 175-179)