Arthurian Literature XVIII

Arthurian Literature XVIII

EDITED BY KEITH BUSBY
Volume: 18
Copyright Date: 2001
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 272
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81qg1
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  • Book Info
    Arthurian Literature XVIII
    Book Description:

    This latest issue of 'Arthurian Literature' continues the tradition of the journal, combining critical studies with editions of primary Arthurian texts. Varied in their linguistic and chronological coverage, the articles deal with major areas of Arthurian studies, from early French romance through late medieval English chronicle to contemporary fiction. Topics include Béroul's 'Tristan', 'Tristan de Nanteuil', the Anglo-Norman 'Brut', and the 'Morte', while an edition of the text of an 'extrait' of Chrétien's 'Erec et Enide' prepared by the eighteenth-century scholar La Curne de Sainte-Palaye offers important insights into both scholarship on Chretien, and our understanding of the Enlightenment. The volume is completed with an encyclopaedic treatment of Arthurian literature, art and film produced between 1995 and 1995, acting as an update to 'The New Arthurian Encyclopedia'. Contributors: RICHARD ILLINGWORTH, JANE TAYLOR, CARLETON CARROLL, MARIA COLOMBO TIMELLI, RALUCA RADULESCU, JULIA MARVIN, NORRIS LACY, RAYMOND THOMPSON.

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-005-0
    Subjects: History, Language & Literature

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-vi)
  3. GENERAL EDITOR’S FOREWORD
    (pp. vii-viii)
    Keith Busby

    Following upon the special issue devoted to the Roman van Walewein, this volume of Arthurian Literature initiates an alternation of miscellanies with theme issues. Varied in their linguistic and chronological coverage, the articles presented in volume XVIII deal with major areas of Arthurian studies, from early French romance through late medieval English chronicle to contemporary fiction. The text of Beroul’s Tristan is one of the enduring enigmas of Old French literature: fragmentary and corrupted in transmission but magnificent. Building on more strictly philological work, the late Richard Illingworth’s in-depth look at its composition casts new light on the relationship between...

  4. I The Composition of the Tristran of Beroul
    (pp. 1-76)
    Richard N. Illingworth

    The Tristran ascribed to Beroul is one of the great narrative poems of French medieval literature.¹ It is also one of the most controversial. The four and a half thousand lines of the extant fragment pose problems that have generated much heat and still, after more than a century of critical examination, remain stubbornly unresolved. The poem is preserved in a single manuscript of the second half of the thirteenth century and is incomplete, lacking both beginning and end, and it is unclear just how much is missing. Little is known of the author except that linguistic evidence suggests that...

  5. II THE LURE OF THE HYBRID: TRISTAN DE NANTEUIL, CHANSON DE GESTE ARTHURIEN?
    (pp. 77-88)
    Jane H. M. Taylor

    I begin this paper with a confession of failure. I had been intending to start with one of those disingenuous preambles which go: ‘For the benefit of anyone to whom Tristan de Nanteuil is not immediately familiar, here is a handy synopsis …’. To wrestle with its intractable meanders, however, is rather like going ten rounds with an octopus: Tristan de Nanteuil is not designed for synopses. Its first few pages, for instance, follow the classic pattern of late medieval epic by fragmenting the centres of interest: mother, father and child Tristan, caught by a classic tempest at sea,² are whisked...

  6. III L’ EXTRAIT DU ROMAN D’EREC ET ENIDE DE LA CURNE DE SAINTE-PALAYE
    (pp. 89-124)
    Carleton W. Carroll and Maria Colombo Timelli

    En 1981 déjà, Cedric E. Pickford soulignait le silence qui entoure le nom de Chrétien de Troyes entre le XIIIe et le XVIe siècle:¹ si ses romans se lisent encore, s’ils font l’objet, outre que de citations et d’allusions,² d’au moins deux mises en prose au XVe siècle (Cligés en 1454, Erec avant 1468),³ le nom du poète est ignoré, délibérément selon Pickford, jusqu’à Geoffroy Tory et aux érudits du XVIe siècle, tels Pasquier, Fauchet, La Croix du Maine et Du Verdier, qui tous nomment Chrétien, dans la plupart des cas pourtant sans avoir une connaissance directe de ses œuvres.⁴...

  7. IV ‘TALKYNG OF CRONYCLES OF KINGES AND OF OTHER POLYCYEZ’: FIFTEENTH-CENTURY MISCELLANIES, THE BRUT AND THE READERSHIP OF LE MORTE DARTHUR
    (pp. 125-142)
    Raluca Radulescu

    King Edward IV’s Black Book and the Ordinances of 1478 describes the type of activities that the squires of the court engaged in:

    Thes esquires of housold of old be acustomed, wynter and somer, in after nonys and in euenynges, to drawe to lordez chambrez within courte, there to kepe honest company aftyr theyre cunyng, in talkyng of cronycles of kinges and of other polycyez, or in pypyng, or harpyng, synging, other actez marciablez, to help ocupy the court and acompany straungers, tyll the tym require of departing.¹

    This passage displays the typical activities of the squires and knights attending...

  8. V ALBINE AND ISABELLE: REGICIDAL QUEENS AND THE HISTORICAL IMAGINATION OF THE ANGLO-NORMAN PROSE BRUT CHRONICLES
    (pp. 143-192)
    Julia Marvin

    About four thousand years after the Creation, the king who has conquered all the world marries his thirty daughters to his subject kings, but the princesses conspire to kill their lords and take mastery for themselves. Foiled in their plot and punished with exile, they are set adrift together, arriving eventually at a deserted island, which the eldest sister, Albine, names after herself. The sisters’ trials do not end after they settle the isle of Albion: seduced by demons, they give birth to giants and are eventually raped by their own hideous offspring. That is, instead of kings, they have...

  9. VI ARTHURIAN LITERATURE, ART, AND FILM, 1995–1999
    (pp. 193-255)

    The following is an encyclopedic treatment, thorough but surely not complete, of Arthurian novels, stories, films, and other forms created between 1995 and the early months of 1999. The 1995 date was chosen because it marked the most recent version of The New Arthurian Encyclopedia (New York: Garland Publishing); since that time, there has been no systematic accounting of new Arthuriana. In addition to the titles that date from those four years, we also include some earlier material not treated elsewhere in earlier listings. Some of that material dates from the nineteenth century and earlier, but we also present discussions...

  10. Back Matter
    (pp. 256-260)