The Vivaldi Compendium

The Vivaldi Compendium

Michael Talbot
Copyright Date: 2011
Published by: Boydell and Brewer,
Pages: 272
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7722/j.ctt81xxb
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  • Book Info
    The Vivaldi Compendium
    Book Description:

    ‘The Vivaldi Compendium’ will serve as the most reliable and up-to-date source of quick reference on the composer Antonio Vivaldi and his music. This takes the form of a dictionary listing persons, places, musical works and many other topics connected with Vivaldi; its alphabetically arranged entries are copiously cross-referenced so as to guide the reader towards related topics. ‘The Vivaldi Compendium’ also provides a gateway to further reading. This is achieved via an extensive bibliography, to which reference is made in most of the dictionary entries. These two sections are complemented by an article-length biography of the composer and a carefully organized list of his works. Knowledge about Vivaldi and his music is still advancing at an incredible rate - many discoveries occurred while the book was in preparation - and every effort has been made to ensure that ‘The Vivaldi Compendium’ represents the latest in Vivaldi research, drawing on the author's close involvement with Vivaldi and Venetian music over four decades. MICHAEL TALBOT is Emeritus Professor of Music at the University of Liverpool and a Fellow of the British Academy. He is known internationally for his studies of late-baroque Italian music, which include recent books on Vivaldi's chamber cantatas [2003] and the same composer's fugal writing [2007].

    eISBN: 978-1-84615-965-7
    Subjects: Music

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-iv)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. v-v)
  3. List of Illustrations
    (pp. vi-viii)
  4. Introduction
    (pp. ix-xii)
    Michael Talbot

    I took the idea of compiling a single-volume encyclopaedia centred on the life and music of Antonio Vivaldi from a shorter book of similar type published in Germany a quarter-century ago. This was Lübbes Vivaldi-Lexikon by the Austrian Vivaldi scholar Walter Kolneder, whose more familiar life-and-works study of the composer did so much to keep interest in Vivaldi alive during the 1960s and 1970s. Kolneder’s Vivaldi-Lexikon was constrained by the pocketbook format of the volume, which had to match that of its companion volumes (Kolneder himself wrote the one on J. S. Bach) issued by the same publisher, Gustav Lübbe...

  5. Biography
    (pp. 1-16)

    When one examines Vivaldi’s life to look for the special factors that made him the remarkable composer he was, one soon arrives at a set of four: his position as a native-born Venetian, his humble birth, his clerical status and – perhaps ultimately most important of all – his lifelong struggle against chronic illness. Each of these factors merits consideration before we start to relate the story of his life.

    To grow up and work in Venice gave a musician a variety of career options and opportunities for profitable employment scarcely found elsewhere. As the capital city of a republic, Venice – unlike,...

  6. Dictionary
    (pp. 17-200)

    Abate This is Italian for ‘abbot’, used most often in the sense of a secular priest not attached either to a church or to a religious order. In Vivaldi’s time abati were very numerous in Italy and had a strong presence in the professions requiring literacy. In Venice, unusually, they performed in public as musicians. Edward Wright (1730) reported: ‘’Tis very usual there to see Priests playing in the Orchestra: the famous Vivaldi (whom they call the Prete rosso*) very well known among us for his Concertoes, was a topping man among them.’ This remark is borne out by a...

  7. Works
    (pp. 201-232)
  8. Bibliography
    (pp. 233-258)
  9. Back Matter
    (pp. 259-259)