Modernism

Modernism: Representations of National Culture

Ahmet Ersoy
Maciej Górny
Vangelis Kechriotis
Volume: 3/2
Copyright Date: 2010
Edition: NED - New edition, 1
Pages: 403
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7829/j.ctt12825n
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  • Book Info
    Modernism
    Book Description:

    Fifty-one texts illustrate the evolution of modernism in Eastern Europe. Essays, articles, poems, or excerpts from longer works offer new opportunities of possible comparisons of the respective national cultures. The volume focuses on the literary and scientific attempts at squaring the circle of individual and collective identities. Often outspokenly critical of the romantic episteme, these texts reflect a more sophisticated and critical stance than in the preceding periods. At the same time, rather than representing a complete rupture, they often continue and confirm the romantic identity narratives, albeit with “other means”. The volume also presents the ways national minorities sought to legitimize their existence with reference to their cultural and institutional peculiarity.

    eISBN: 978-615-5211-94-2
    Subjects: Political Science

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. i-vi)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. vii-viii)
  3. Editorial note
    (pp. ix-x)
  4. CHAPTER I. CULTURAL MODERNIZATION: INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF “NATIONAL SCIENCES”
    (pp. 1-74)

    The period between 1875 and 1893 was marked by an attempt to introduce a series of reforms in Greek society under the political leadership of British-educated and western-oriented Harilaos Trikoupis. Contrary to the priorities of irredentism and territorial expansion prevailing until then, the aim now was to create a modern, rationally-organized and strong state. This need derived not less from the realization that the Greeks’ glorious past, conveniently appropriated and celebrated during the first decades of independence, did not suffice any more to attract European interest and sympathy. Neo-Hellenes were to prove that the cultural origins they claimed could be...

  5. CHAPTER II. THE “CRITICAL TURNS”: SUBVERTING THE ROMANTIC NARRATIVES
    (pp. 75-160)

    Szujski’s text is a result of bitter discussions that followed the suppression of the Polish uprising of 1863–64. As with many other participants in the unsuccessful struggle for independence, Szujski radically re-evaluated his attitude towards Polish history and Polish politics. It should be mentioned that Szujski’s ideas do not represent the first attempt to re-interpret the national program in Galicia. Szujski simply followed his elder colleague, Antoni Zygmunt Helcel, whose political ideas turned from Romantic activism into political realism during the days of the Galician Jacquerie (a peasant revolt directed against Polish gentry) of 1846. Starting in the early...

  6. CHAPTER III. LITERARY REPRESENTATIONS OF THE “NATIONAL CHARACTER”
    (pp. 161-248)

    Henryk Sienkiewicz belonged to the group of writers and publicists who were influenced by the ideology of positivism. They advocated the economic and social modernization of the country as well as the termination of explicit irredentism. Since the Russian authorities were not interested in supporting Polish development, the positivists relied on the internal resources of Polish society, appealing to the gentry and the bourgeoisie to support the modernization of the country and the education of the lower social strata. Contrary to other members of the intelligentsia in the Russian part of Poland (such as Aleksander Świętochowski or Eliza Orzeszkowa), Sienkiewicz,...

  7. CHAPTER IV. AESTHETIC MODERNISM AND COLLECTIVE IDENTITIES
    (pp. 249-330)

    During the 1870s and 1880s, the reforms introduced by successive governments of the most important nineteenth century Greek politician, Harilaos Trikoupis, had brought new hope for the future of Greek society. Despite the alienation of the rural population, these reforms encouraged various groups in the urban centers to participate in political and intellectual life. The intellectual atmosphere of the 1880s was also marked by Nikolaos Politis’s contributions to the study of folk culture. Moreover, Athens witnessed the emergence of a new generation, the so-called ‘Athenian school of the 1880s,’ which abandoned the austere classicism of the post-revolutionary period. Instead, the...

  8. CHAPTER V. REGIONALISM, AUTONOMISM AND THE MINORITY IDENTITY-BUILDING NARRATIVES
    (pp. 331-392)

    In Europe, the nineteenth century was an era of constitutionalism, and the Ottoman Empire was not an exception. The late 1850s saw the emergence of a movement, generally described as the ‘Young Ottomans,’ which demanded a constitution and a representative Parliament. Thanks to the diffusion of liberal ideas throughout the Empire, a group of people, mainly constituted by intellectuals, asked for a more democratic and participatory way of government as a reaction to the centralizing policies of the Tanzimat.

    Similar tendencies existed within the Armenian community of the Empire. In a sense, the community had its own ‘young’ radicals. Throughout...