Anonymus and Master Roger

Anonymus and Master Roger

Martyn Rady
László Veszprémy
János M. Bak
Martyn Rady
JÁNOS M. BAK
URSZULA BORKOWSKA
GILES CONSTABLE
GERHARD JARITZ
GÁBOR KLANICZAY
Volume: 5
Copyright Date: 2010
Edition: NED - New edition, 1
Pages: 326
https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7829/j.ctt2jbnhk
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  • Book Info
    Anonymus and Master Roger
    Book Description:

    Contains two very different narratives; both are for the first time presented in an updated Latin text with an annotated English translation. An anonymous notary of King Bela of Hungary wrote a Latin Gesta Hungarorum (ca. 1200/10), a literary composition about the mythical origins of the Hungarians and their conquest of the Carpathian Basin. Anonymus tried to (re)construct the events and protagonists—including ethnic groups—of several centuries before from the names of places, rivers, and mountains of his time, assuming that these retained the memory of times past. One of his major “inventions” was the inclusion of Attila the Hun into the Hungarian royal genealogy, a feature later developed into the myth of Hun-Hungarian continuity. The Epistle to the Sorrowful Lament upon the Destruction of the Kingdom of Hungary by the Tartars of Master Roger includes an eyewitness account of the Mongol invasion in 1241–2, beginning with an analysis of the political conditions under King Bela IV and ending with the king’s return to the devastated country.

    eISBN: 978-963-9776-96-8
    Subjects: History

Table of Contents

  1. Front Matter
    (pp. I-IV)
  2. Table of Contents
    (pp. V-VI)
  3. GENERAL EDITORS’ PREFACE
    (pp. VII-VIII)
    J. M. B, U. B., G. C., G. J. and G. K.
  4. ABBREVIATIONS
    (pp. IX-XII)
  5. LIST OF MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS
    (pp. XIII-XIV)
  6. ANONYMUS
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. XVII-XXXVIII)

      The Gesta Hungarorum of the anonymous notary of King Béla is the oldest extant chronicle of the history of the Hungarians.¹ In his seminal study of the narrative sources of medieval Hungary, C. A. Macartney described it as “the most famous, the most obscure, the most exasperating and most misleading of all the early Hungarian texts.”² Purporting to be an account of the background, circumstances and immediate aftermath of the Hungarian settlement in the Carpathian Basin in the late ninth century, the chronicle was probably composed in the early years of the thirteenth century and reflects the literary tastes and...

    • INCIPIT PROLOGUS IN GESTA HUNGARORUM
      (pp. 2-2)

      [SRH, 33] P dictusb magister ac quondam bone memorie gloriosissimi Bele regis Hungarie notarius¹ N suo dilectissimo amico, viro venerabili et arte litteralis scientie inbutosalutem et sue petitionis effectumc.³ Dum olim in scolari studio simul essemus et in hystoria Troiana, quam ego cum summo amore complexus ex libris Darethis Frigii⁴ ceterorumque auctorum,⁵ sicut a magistris meis audiveram, in unum volumen proprio stilo compilaveram, pari voluntate legeremus, petisti a me, ut, sicut hystoriam Troianam bellaque Grecorum scripseram, ita et genealogiam regum Hungarie et nobilium suorum, qualiter septem principales persone, que Hetumoger⁶ vocantur, de terra Scithica descenderunt vel qualis sit terra...

    • HERE BEGINS THE PROLOGUE TO THE DEEDS OF THE HUNGARIANS
      (pp. 3-130)

      P who is called master, and sometime notary of the most glorious Béla, king of Hungary of fond memory,¹ to the venerable man N his most dear friend steeped in the knowledge of letters:² Greetings, and the answer to his plea.³ When we were together at school reading with common purpose the story of Troy that I had brought most lovingly together into one volume from the books of Dares Phrygius⁴ and other authors,⁵ in suitable style, as I was taught by my masters, you asked me that, in the same way as I had written on the history of...

  7. MASTER ROGER
    • INTRODUCTION
      (pp. XLI-LIV)

      The report of Master Roger on the Mongol invasion of Hungary is a rare text, being an eyewitness account of a major historical event in the thirteenth century. As such, it may be compared on the one hand with Galbert of Bruges’s twelfth-century narrative of the murder of Charles the Good, and, on the other, with Archdeacon Thomas of Split’s less immediate, but still contemporary account of the Mongol attack.¹

      Although written within a few years after the events of 1241–42, the text is extant only in a fifteenth-century printed edition. It is clear from the biography of the...

    • EPISTOLA MAGISTRI ROGERII IN MISERABILE CARMEN SUPER DESTRUCTIONE REGNI HUNGARIE PER TARTAROS FACTA EDITUM AD REVERENDUM DOMINUM IACOBUM PRENESTINE ECCLESIE EPISCOPUM FELICITER INCIPIT.
      (pp. 132-132)

      Licet, ut liqueat dominationi vestre ingressus et processus Tartarorum² Hungariam intrantium in ignominia crucifixi, perniciem stragemque non minimam populi Christiani, presens opusculum vestro nomini reddi de gestis ipsorum sine falsitatis admixtione collectum, quod cum diligentia perlegatis. Multa quidem invenietis in eo, que meo subiacuerunt aspectui plurimaque propriis palpavi manibus nonnullaque a fide dignis didici, in quorum illa fuerunt presentia perpetrata. Si autem interdum reperietis aliqua, que sensui hominum cernantur terribilia et horrenda, me scriptorem et res minime amirentur, sed gratias referant regi regum,³ qui sue oblitus misericordie suo angariato populo non pepercit. Nam a regalibus sedibus in exterminii terram prosilientibus...

    • MASTER ROGER’S EPISTLE TO THE LAMENT UPON THE DESTRUCTION OF HUNGARY BY THE TATARS WRITTEN TO THE REVEREND LORD JAMES, BISHOP OF THE CHURCH OF PRENESTE
      (pp. 133-228)

      May it be allowed to send to you this little writing of mine in order that the entry and passage of the Tatars² to the dishonor of the Crucified and the very great destruction and harm of the Christian people may stand clearly before your lordship. I have composed it about their deeds without stating anything untruthful. May you read it carefully; for indeed, you will find in it much that happened before my own eyes, many other things that I experienced myself,³ and others I was told by trustworthy persons in whose presence they happened. But should you at...

  8. SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
    (pp. 229-242)
  9. INDEX OF NAMES OF PERSONS, KINDREDS, AND PEOPLES
    (pp. 243-250)
  10. INDEX OF GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
    (pp. 251-262)
  11. GAZETTEERS OF GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
    (pp. 263-268)
  12. [Illustrations]
    (pp. 269-270)
  13. Back Matter
    (pp. 271-271)